día

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Asturian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Inherited from Vulgar Latin *dia, first-declension reshaping of Classical Latin diēs.

Noun[edit]

día m (plural díes)

  1. day

See also[edit]

Catalan[edit]

Noun[edit]

día f (plural díes)

  1. Obsolete spelling of dia [–19th c.]
    • 1904, Ramón Bartomeus, Lo Gran día: sarsuela de costums catalanas en dos actes[1], Biblioteca L'Escón, page 37:
      Avuy será un día de moltas trifulgas, més de quatre cops me veuré obligat á intervenir ab los assumptos del poble, []
      (please add an English translation of this quotation)

Galician[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • dia (reintegrationist)

Etymology[edit]

Inherited from Old Galician-Portuguese dia, from Vulgar Latin *dia, first-declension reshaping of Classical Latin diēs.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

día m (plural días)

  1. day (24 hours)
  2. period of light, when the sun is above the horizon
    Antonym: noite

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • dia” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006–2022.
  • día” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006–2013.
  • día” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • día” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

Ladino[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

día m (Latin spelling)

  1. day

Old Irish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Celtic *dīyos (compare Welsh dydd), from Proto-Indo-European *dyew-. Cognate with Latin diēs.

Noun[edit]

día (gender unknown)

  1. day
    Synonym:
Inflection[edit]
Unknown gender irregular
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative día, die
Vocative
Accusative , dei
Genitive día, die
Dative , dei
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization

Further reading[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-Celtic *dēwos (compare Welsh duw), from Proto-Indo-European *deywós (compare Sanskrit देव (devá), Latin deus, Old English Tīw (Germanic god of heroic glory)), from Proto-Indo-European *dyew- (to shine).

Noun[edit]

día m (genitive , nominative plural )

  1. god
    • c. 800, Würzburg Glosses on the Pauline Epistles, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 499–712, Wb. 7d10
      Mógi sidi uili do Día; acht do·rigénsat in descipuil dechor etarru et déu diib: is hed on ɔsecha-som hic.
      They are all servants to God; but the disciples had made a distinction between them and (made) gods of them; that is what he corrects here.
    • c. 845, St Gall Glosses on Priscian, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1975, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. II, pp. 49–224, Sg. 65a1
      Níbu machdath do·rónta día dind lïac.
      It was not a wonder that a god would be made of the stone.
    • c. 845, St Gall Glosses on Priscian, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1975, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. II, pp. 49–224, Sg. 162a3
      In tan labratar ind ḟilid a persin inna ṅdea, do·gniat primam ⁊ secundam in illis.
      When the poets speak in the person of the gods, they make a first and second [person] in them.
Declension[edit]
Masculine o-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative día díaL L
Vocative díaL déuH
Accusative díaN díaL déuH
Genitive L día díaN, dea
Dative díaL déib déib
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • Irish: dia
  • Manx: jee
  • Scottish Gaelic: dia

Further reading[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
día día
pronounced with /ð(ʲ)-/
ndía
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Spanish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Inherited from Old Spanish dia, from Vulgar Latin *dia, first-declension reshaping of Classical Latin diēs, from Proto-Italic *djous, from Proto-Indo-European *dyḗws (heaven, sky). Compare Old Occitan dia and Old Galician-Portuguese dia. Not cognate with English day.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈdia/ [ˈd̪i.a]
  • Audio:(file)
  • Rhymes: -ia
  • Syllabification: dí‧a

Noun[edit]

día m (plural días)

  1. day (any period of 24 hours)
  2. day (a period from midnight to the following midnight)
    • 1605, Miguel de Cervantes, “Capítulo I”, in El ingenioso hidalgo Don Quijote de la Mancha, Primera parte:
      El resto della concluían sayo de velarte, calzas de velludo para las fiestas, con sus pantuflos de lo mesmo, y los días de entresemana se honraba con su vellorí de lo más fino.
      The rest of it went in a doublet of fine cloth and velvet breeches and shoes to match for holidays, while on week-days he made a brave figure in his best homespun.
  3. day (rotational period of a planet)
  4. day (the part of a day period which one spends at work, school, etc.)
    Synonym: jornada
  5. day, daytime (the part of the day between sunrise and sunset)
    Antonym: noche

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Papiamentu: dia
  • Sardinian: dia (Campidanese)

Further reading[edit]