ferial

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French ferial or Medieval Latin ferialis, from Latin fēria ‎(weekday) (whence the first sense), fēriae ‎(holidays) (whence the second).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

ferial ‎(not comparable)

  1. (ecclesiastical) Pertaining to an ordinary weekday, rather than a festival or fast.
  2. Jovial, festive, as if pertaining to a holiday.
    • 1922, James Joyce, Ulysses:
      In a ferial tone he addressed J. J. O’Molloy: —Taylor had come there, you must know, from a sick bed.
    • 1922, Aldous Huxley, Crome Yellow, page 274:
      [They] dance within the magic shade
      That makes them drunken, merry, and strong
      To laugh and sing their ferial song :
      'Free, free . . . !'

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

ferial ‎(plural ferials)

  1. (ecclesiastical) A feria.

Anagrams[edit]


Old French[edit]

Adjective[edit]

ferial m

  1. ferial (pertaining to a holiday)

Spanish[edit]

Adjective[edit]

ferial m, f ‎(plural feriales)

  1. ferial, on a weekday