fridge

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See also: 'fridge

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /fɹɪd͡ʒ/
  • (file)
    Rhymes: -ɪdʒ

Etymology 1[edit]

An open refrigerator

Clipped form of refrigerator.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

fridge (plural fridges)

  1. (informal) A refrigerator.
    • 2012 May 8, Yotam Ottolenghi; Sami Tamimi, Ottolenghi: The Cookbook[1], Random House, →ISBN, page 79:
      First, marinate the tofu. In a bowl, whisk the kecap manis, chilli sauce, and sesame oil together. Cut the tofu into strips about 1cm thick, mix gently (so it doesn't break) with the marinade and leave in the fridge for half an hour.
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

fridge (third-person singular simple present fridges, present participle fridging, simple past and past participle fridged)

  1. (informal) To place inside of a refrigerator.
    • 2007, Lucy Diamond, Any Way You Want Me, Pan (2007), →ISBN, page 201:
      I had turned up with a bottle, which the hostess, Celia, had duly fridged, but everyone else had opted for camomile tea, making me feel like the biggest lush in south London.
    • 2013, Jeffrey Deaver, The October List, Grand Central Publishing (2013), →ISBN, unnumbered page:
      He munched and sipped, wished the soda was cold. Should have fridged it.
    • 2013, James Morton, Brilliant Bread, Ebury Press (2013), →ISBN, page 134:
      If you don't have two stones, bake it in two different batches, fridging your remaining doughs whilst you wait.

Etymology 2[edit]

This fandom verb sense was coined by Gail Simone, who criticized a plot point in Green Lantern #54, in which Kyle Rayner, the Green Lantern, comes home to discover that a villain has murdered his girlfriend and left her body for him to find in the refrigerator.[1]

Verb[edit]

fridge (third-person singular simple present fridges, present participle fridging, simple past and past participle fridged)

  1. (fandom slang) To gratuitously kill, disempower, or otherwise remove a character, usually female, from a narrative, often strictly to hurt another character, usually male, and provide him with a personal motivation for fighting the antagonist(s).
    • 2013, Siobhan Whitebread, "Welcome to the Punch: A little less conversation", Spark* (University of Reading), Volume 63, Issue 1, 26 April 2013, page 15:
      The backing cast are also all excellent, as expected considering the calibre of actors attached to the film – Andrea Riseborough is a very good example, playing a fascinating cop who really didn't deserve to be 'fridged' (meaning: removed from the action so that the men can do their manly things).
    • 2014, Tim Hanley, Wonder Woman Unbound: The Curious History of the World's Most Famous Heroine, Chicago Review Press (2014), →ISBN, page 240:
      In terms of villains, familiar characters haven't been fridged but they've been rather sexualized.
    • 2014 June 1, Dave Van Domelen, “Dave's Capsules for May 2014”, in alt.toys.transformers, Usenet[2]:
      Gwen dying is as big a part of Spider-Man's storyline as Uncle Ben dying. But originally, she was fridged, long before that was a thing. Gwen was something of a pretty nonentity in the comics, her death really only served the purpose of hurting Peter. She died a victim, yanked around by other characters.
    • 2019 May 5, Danette Chavez, “Campaigns are waged on and off the Game Of Thrones battlefield (newbies)”, in The A.V. Club[3]:
      There’s more than a hint of fridging to Missandei’s death, as she leaves behind a grief-stricken Grey Worm along with Daenerys.

Etymology 3[edit]

Probably imitatory; compare frig.

Verb[edit]

fridge (third-person singular simple present fridges, present participle fridging, simple past and past participle fridged)

  1. (archaic) To rub, chafe.
    • 1761, Laurence Sterne, The Life & Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman, volume III, Penguin, published 2003, page 145:
      You might have rumpled and crumpled, and doubled and creased, and fretted and fridged the outsides of them all to pieces
    • 1913, D. H. Lawrence, Sons and Lovers:
      The town spread upwards before them, smoking vaguely in the midday glare, fridging the crest away to the south with spires and factory bulks and chimneys.
See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Tim Hanley, Wonder Woman Unbound: The Curious History of the World's Most Famous Heroine, Chicago Review Press (2014), →ISBN, pages 238-239