kismet

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: Kismet and kısmet

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Ottoman Turkish قسمت(kısmet, fate, destiny) (Turkish kısmet), from Arabic قِسْمَة(qisma, division, lot, destiny).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

kismet (usually uncountable, plural kismets)

  1. Fate; a predetermined or unavoidable destiny.
    Synonyms: destiny, fate, fortune, lot
    • 1887, Rudyard Kipling, Bitters Neat:
      But these things are kismet, and we only find out all about them just when any knowledge is too late.
    • 1917, Percival Christopher Wren, “The Rafters”, in The Young Stagers:
      "Golly!" he cried. "I'm awfully sorry, Bo'sun, but you're It. You're luck's clean out to-day. What rotten Kismet you do have. The Lot fell on you all right, smack in the middle of your chest."
    • 1920, F. Scott Fitzgerald, chapter III, in The Camel's Back:
      But at this point fickle Kismet, who for a day had played with him bitterly and sardonically, decided to reward him in full for the amusement he had afforded her. Kismet turned the tawny eyes of the snake-charmer to the camel. Kismet led her to lean toward the man beside her and say, "Who's that? That camel?"
    • 2019 June 8, Kitty Empire, “Madonna: Madame X review – a splendidly bizarre return to form”, in The Guardian[1]:
      Sexualised Catholicism, at the dawn of MTV, was Madonna’s first stroke of kismet.

Translations[edit]


Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Ottoman Turkish قسمت(kısmet), from Persian قسمت(qesmat), from Arabic قِسْمَة(qisma).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /kǐsmet/
  • Hyphenation: kis‧met

Noun[edit]

kìsmet m (Cyrillic spelling кѝсмет)

  1. kismet
  2. fate

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]