manes

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See also: manés, manès, mânes, mañes, månes, and manęs

English[edit]

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Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin manes (spirits of the dead).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

manes pl (plural only)

  1. The souls or spirits of dead ancestors, conceived as deities or the subjects of reverence.
    • 1658, Sir Thomas Browne, Urne-Burial, Penguin 2005, p. 9
      this was the Ustrina or place of burning their bodies, or some sacrificing place unto the Manes
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

manes

  1. plural of mane

Anagrams[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Verb[edit]

manes

  1. second-person singular present indicative form of manar

Latin[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Literally "the good ones", substantive use of the masculine plural of mānis (good).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mānēs m pl (genitive mānium); third declension

  1. the spirits of dead ancestors; deified shades
  2. a corpse
  3. ashes; remains
  4. the netherworld
Inflection[edit]

Third declension i-stem.

Case Plural
nominative mānēs
genitive mānium
dative mānibus
accusative mānēs
ablative mānibus
vocative mānēs

Descendants[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Non-lemma forms.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

mānēs

  1. inflection of mānis:
    1. nominative masculine singular
    2. accusative masculine singular
    3. vocative masculine singular
    4. nominative feminine singular
    5. accusative feminine singular
    6. vocative feminine singular

Etymology 3[edit]

Non-lemma forms.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

manēs

  1. second-person singular present active indicative of maneō

References[edit]

  • manes in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • manes” in Félix Gaffiot’s Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette (1934)
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • (ambiguous) to have something in one's hands, on hand: in manibus habere aliquid (also metaphorically)
    • (ambiguous) to wrest from a person's hand: ex or de manibus alicui or alicuius extorquere aliquid
    • (ambiguous) to let go from one's hands: e manibus dimittere
    • (ambiguous) to carry in one's arms: in manibus aliquem gestare
    • (ambiguous) to slip, escape from the hands: e (de) manibus effugere, elābi
    • (ambiguous) to sit with folded arms; to be inactive: compressis manibus sedere (proverb.) (Liv. 7. 13)
    • (ambiguous) to have success in one's grasp: fortunam in manibus habere
    • (ambiguous) to let success slip through one's fingers: fortunam ex manibus dimittere
    • (ambiguous) to be engaged on a book: liber mihi est in manibus
    • (ambiguous) to be engaged on a book: librum in manibus habere (Acad. 1. 1. 2)
    • (ambiguous) the book, speech can easily be obtained: liber, oratio in manibus est
    • (ambiguous) to lay down a book (vid. sect. XII. 3, note vestem deponere...): librum de manibus ponere
    • (ambiguous) to appease the manes, make sacrifice for departed souls: manes expiare (Pis. 7. 16)
    • (ambiguous) to wrest weapons from some one's hands: extorquere arma e manibus
    • (ambiguous) to not let the enemy escape: hostem e manibus non dimittere
    • (ambiguous) to escape from the hands of the enemy: effugere, elābi e manibus hostium
    • (ambiguous) to let the enemy escape: dimittere e manibus hostes
    • (ambiguous) to rescue some one from the hands of the enemy: eripere aliquem e manibus hostium
  • manes in The Perseus Project (1999) Perseus Encyclopedia[2]
  • manes in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • manes in William Smith, editor (1848) A Dictionary of Greek Biography and Mythology, London: John Murray
  • manes in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin

Portuguese[edit]

Noun[edit]

manes m pl (plurale tantum)

  1. (Roman mythology) manes (spirits of the dead)

Spanish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

manes

  1. Informal second-person singular () present subjunctive form of manar.

Volapük[edit]

Noun[edit]

manes

  1. dative plural of man