manso

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See also: Manso

Chavacano[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Spanish manso (tame).

Adjective[edit]

manso

  1. meek; tame

Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Vulgar Latin *mansus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

manso (feminine mansa, masculine plural mansos, feminine plural manses)

  1. Alternative form of mans (tame)

Noun[edit]

manso m (plural mansos)

  1. (colloquial) guy, chap, fellow
    Synonym: paio
  2. (colloquial) boyfriend
    Synonym: amant

Further reading[edit]


Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Galician and Old Portuguese manso, from Vulgar Latin *mansus, from Latin mansuetus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

manso m (feminine singular mansa, masculine plural mansos, feminine plural mansas)

  1. (of animals) tame (mild and well-behaved)
    Antonym: bravo
  2. (of plants) grafted; cultured
    Antonym: bravo
  3. (of people) meek; gentle
    Antonym: bravo
  4. (of nature and natural phenomena) mild; gentle

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • manso” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006–2012.
  • manso” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006–2016.
  • manso” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006–2013.
  • manso” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • manso” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

Italian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈman.so/
  • Rhymes: -anso
  • Hyphenation: màn‧so

Etymology 1[edit]

From Vulgar Latin *mānsus, back-formed from Latin mānsuētus.

Adjective[edit]

manso (feminine mansa, masculine plural mansi, feminine plural manse)

  1. (literary, regional) meek, tame
    • 1321, Dante Alighieri, La divina commedia: Purgatorio [The Divine Comedy: Purgatory] (paperback), Bompiani, published 2001, Canto XXVIII, lines 76–78, page 416:
      Quali si stanno ruminando manse ¶ le capre, state rapide e proterve ¶ sovra le cime avante che sien pranse
      Even as in ruminating passive grow the goats, who have been swift and venturesome upon the mountain-tops ere they were fed
    Synonyms: docile, mansueto
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Medieval Latin mānsum (residence), from Latin mānsus, perfect passive participle of maneō (I stay, remain).

Noun[edit]

manso m (plural mansi)

  1. (historical) an amount of land (usually 12 jugerums) considered cultivable yearly by using two oxen or a single plough

Latin[edit]

Participle[edit]

mānsō

  1. dative/ablative masculine/neuter singular of mānsus

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Vulgar Latin *mansus, from Latin mansuetus.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈmɐ̃.su/, [ˈmɐ̃.su]

  • Hyphenation: man‧so
  • Rhymes: -ɐ̃su

Adjective[edit]

manso m (feminine singular mansa, masculine plural mansos, feminine plural mansas, comparable)

  1. (of animals) tame (mild and well-behaved)
  2. (of people) meek; submissive (following orders without protest)
  3. (of nature and natural phenomena) mild; gentle; tranquil

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • manso” in Dicionário Priberam da Língua Portuguesa.

Spanish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Vulgar Latin *mansus, from Latin mansuetus.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈmanso/, [ˈmãn.so]

Adjective[edit]

manso (feminine mansa, masculine plural mansos, feminine plural mansas)

  1. tame, meek; not threatening
    Antonyms: bravo, amenazante, agresivo, peligroso, perrucho

Noun[edit]

manso m (plural mansos)

  1. bellwether (the leading sheep, goat or res of a flock)
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Possibly an alteration of inmenso.

Adjective[edit]

manso (feminine mansa, masculine plural mansos, feminine plural mansas)

  1. (colloquial, intensifier, Chile) gigantic, big
Usage notes[edit]

Used before the noun in exclamatory phrases, sometimes preceded by an article

Further reading[edit]