mink

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See also: Mink

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

A jacket and vest made of mink (sense 2)

From Late Middle English mink (fur of the European mink),[1] apparently from Swedish [Term?].[2]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mink (plural mink or minks)

  1. (plural mink or minks) Any of various semi-aquatic, carnivorous mammals in the Mustelinae subfamily, similar to weasels, with dark fur, native to Europe and America, of which two species in different genera are extant: the American mink (Neovison vison) and the European mink (Mustela lutreola).
    • 1792, George Cartwright, “The First Voyage”, in A Journal of Transactions and Events, during a Residence of nearly Sixteen Years on the Coast of Labrador; [] In Three Volumes, volume I, Newark, Peterborough: Printed and sold by Allin and Ridge; [], OCLC 938287134, page 33:
      [Friday 7.] I ſhot three brace of grouſe, and found a mink in one of the traps which I tailed yesterday. [Saturday 8.] The ſame trap caught another mink to-day.
    • 1865, Henry D[avid] Thoreau, “The Sea and the Desert”, in Cape Cod, Boston, Mass.: Ticknor and Fields, OCLC 458294996, page 187:
      He also said that minks, muskrats, foxes, coons, and wild mice were found there, but no squirrels.
    • 1873 March, O. S. Bayley, “Trapping the Mink”, in American Agriculturist: For the Farm, Garden, and Household, volume XXXII, number 3 (New Series; number 314 overall), New York, N.Y.: Published by Orange Judd Company [], OCLC 77764039, page 93, column 1:
      The Mink, so highly valued for its fur, being an amphibious animal, is equally at home upon the land or in the water. [] The relentlessness with which trapping has been pursued has threatened, in some localities, the extermination of the Mink, and the legislature of at least one State has properly made it punishable by fine to kill a mink between the months of March and November following.
    • 2008, Susan H. Gray, “Scrambled Eggs”, in American Mink (Animal Invaders), Ann Arbor, Mich.: Cherry Lake Publishing, →ISBN, page 26:
      Scientists are wondering if otters might help control the mink. Otters live in the same habitats that American mink do. They like to be near water, just as mink do. They also eat the same foods that mink eat.
  2. (plural mink) The fur or pelt of a mink, used to make apparel.
    • 1749, “[Appendix.] Number X. An Account of the Amount of Sales Made by the Hudson’s Bay Company, Specifying the Several Articles, and the Average Price of Each Article, for Ten Years Last Past.”, in Report from the Committee Appointed to Inquire into the State and Condition of the Countries Adjoining to Hudson’s Bay, and of the Trade Carried on There, London: [s.n.], OCLC 558222460, page 252:
      From Michaelmas 1739. to Michaelmas 1740. Skins. [] Mink at 2s. 4d. Elk at 8s. Deer at 2s. 7½ per Skin.
    • 1925 September, C. H. Edman, “Selma”, in Al C. Joy, editor, San Joaquin Power Magazine, volume VII, number 9, Fresno, Calif.: San Joaquin Light & Power Corporation, OCLC 22413218, page 28:
      H. H. Young, district manager, is the proud possessor of a fine mink fur, which he found in his hen house. The mink, while wearing the fur, visited Young's hen house once too often and was cornered there a few mornings ago.
    • 1951 December 3, Robert Wallace, “It’s Usually Rabbit: For the Innocent Fur Shopper, Lost in a Jungle of ‘Mink-dyed Baltic Coneys,’ here is Some Timely Advice on How to Keep from Getting Skinned in the Salon”, in Henry R[obinson] Luce, editor, Life, volume 31, number 23, Chicago, Ill.; New York, N.Y.: Time Inc., ISSN 0024-3019, OCLC 34142982, pages 90 and 95:
      There are, unfortunately, three kinds of minks: standard ranch minks, wild minks (that is, good wild minks, notably those from Labrador), and ranch mutation minks. Standard ranch minks are brown to black-brown and are the ones that wind up in $3,000-to-$5,000 coats. Labrador minks are dark blue-brown; coats made of them cost up to $20,000. Mutation minks come in many colors at prices that require courage to quote aloud.
    • 1988, Edith Weisskopf-Joelson, “Emigration from Childhood”, in Father, Have I Kept My Promise?: Madness as Seen from Within, West Lafayette, Ind.: Purdue University Press, →ISBN, page 11:
      I seem to be able to get SS officers to worry about me, millionaires to propose to me, and yet I am absolutely unable to present myself as the kind of person I am. I couldn't care less about mink coats or diamonds. Not for one moment do I consider marrying Mr. Rabinowitz.
  3. (plural minks) An article of clothing made of mink.
    • 2010, J[ohn] Randy Taraborrelli, “Son vs. Father”, in Michael Jackson: The Magic, the Madness, the Whole Story, updated paperback edition, London: Pan Books, →ISBN, part 5, page 255:
      At one point, money was stolen from one of the bedrooms. [] Afte that, the family employees were often tested. [Katherine] Jackson would leave the alarm on the closet unarmed, the one in which she kept her minks, chinchillas, and other expensive furs.
    • 2014, Anna Godbersen, “Chapter Thirty-six: Los Angeles, June 1962”, in The Blonde: A Novel, New York, N.Y.: Weinstein Books, →ISBN, page 313:
      He had noticed Marilyn putting a flask into the coat of her mink after she talked to the Gent, and he was sure there had been nothing in the pockets earlier, when he helped her into it before she sang "Happy Birthday."
  4. (Scotland, slang, derogatory) (plural minks) An individual with poor personal hygiene; a smelly person.

Hyponyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ mink, n.” in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 16 April 2018.
  2. ^ mink” (US) / “mink” (UK) in Oxford Dictionaries, Oxford University Press.

Further reading[edit]


Estonian[edit]

Estonian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia et

Etymology 1[edit]

From English mink.

Noun[edit]

mink (genitive mingi, partitive minki)

  1. American mink, Neovison vison
Declension[edit]
Synonyms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From German Schminke.

Noun[edit]

mink (genitive mingi, partitive minki)

  1. (dated) makeup, cosmetics
Declension[edit]
Synonyms[edit]

Hungarian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • mi (offical)

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈmiŋk]
  • Hyphenation: mink

Pronoun[edit]

mink

  1. (personal, dialectal) Alternative form of mi (we)

Declension[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

Etymology[edit]

From English mink.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mink m (definite singular minken, indefinite plural minkar, definite plural minkane)

  1. an American mink, Neovison vison or Mustela vison
    • 1928, Edv. Ryste, Mink-al:
      Å ala mink er eit gildt arbeid for alle som er glade i dyr; for det er eit vakkert dyr med mange tiltalande eigenskapar []
      Breeding mink is pleasant work for everyone who loves animals; as it is a beautiful animal with many appealing properties []

References[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Noun[edit]

mink c

  1. American mink (Neovison vison).

Declension[edit]

Declension of mink 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative mink minken minkar minkarna
Genitive minks minkens minkars minkarnas