nanti

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See also: nántí and nãnti

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from Sabir nanti, from Italian niente, from Latin ne gentem (no person, no one), nec entem, ne entem or ne inde.

Determiner[edit]

nanti

  1. (Polari) No; not any.
    • 1851, Mayhew, Henry, “Our Street Folk”, in London Labour and the London Poor[1], volume 3, published 1861, The Canvas Clown, page 126:
      There was no clown for the pantomime, for he had disappointed us, and of course they couldn't get on without one; so, to keep the concern going, old Johnson, who know I was a good tumbler, came up to me, and said 'he had nanti vampo, and your nabs must fake it;' which means,—We have no clown, and you must do it.
    • 2004, Baker, Paul, Fantabulosa: A Dictionary of Polari and Gay Slang:
      She's with the trade your mother charvaed yesterday. Some omees have nanti taste!
    • 2012 January 10, Karis, “Gareth's bright blue outfit”, in Big Brother Forum (Digital Spy)[2]:
      I can't see that over his heaving thews and bulging lallies!¶ Of course he's nanti riah, but with a basket like that, who cares about his eek?

Derived terms[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Past participle of nantir.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

nanti (feminine singular nantie, masculine plural nantis, feminine plural nanties)

  1. paid, having received wages
  2. rich, well-off, well-to-do

Noun[edit]

nanti m (plural nantis)

  1. one who is wealthy and privileged

Verb[edit]

nanti m (feminine singular nantie, masculine plural nantis, feminine plural nanties)

  1. past participle of nantir

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Indonesian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

nanti

  1. later

Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

nanti

  1. to wait

Walloon[edit]

Adjective[edit]

nanti

  1. tired, exhausted