wage

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: Wage and wäge

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English wage, from Anglo-Norman wage, from Old Northern French wage, a northern variant of Old French gauge, guage (whence modern French gage), Medieval Latin wadium, from Frankish *waddī (cognate with Old English wedd), from Proto-Germanic *wadją (pledge), from Proto-Indo-European *wedʰ- (to pledge, redeem a pledge). Akin to Old Norse veðja (to pledge), Gothic 𐍅𐌰𐌳𐌹 (wadi). Compare also the doublet gage. More at wed.

Noun[edit]

wage (plural wages)

  1. An amount of money paid to a worker for a specified quantity of work, usually calculated on an hourly basis and expressed in an amount of money per hour.
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English wagen (to pledge), from Anglo-Norman, Old Northern French wagier, a northern variant of Old French guagier (whence modern French gager), itself either from guage or from a derivative of Frankish *waddi, *wadja, possibly through a Vulgar Latin intermediate *wadiare from *wadium.

Verb[edit]

wage (third-person singular simple present wages, present participle waging, simple past and past participle waged)

  1. (transitive, obsolete) To wager, bet.
    • William Shakespeare (c.1564–1616)
      My life I never held but as a pawn / To wage against thy enemies.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Hakluyt to this entry?)
  2. (transitive, obsolete) To expose oneself to, as a risk; to incur, as a danger; to venture; to hazard.
  3. (transitive, obsolete) To employ for wages; to hire.
    • 1485, Sir Thomas Malory, chapter xviij, in Le Morte Darthur, book I:
      Thenne said Arthur I wille goo with yow / Nay said the kynges ye shalle not at this tyme / for ye haue moche to doo yet in these landes / therfore we wille departe / and with the grete goodes that we haue goten in these landes by youre yeftes we shalle wage good knyghtes & withstande the kynge Claudas malyce
    • Raphael Holinshed (1529-1580)
      abundance of treasure which he had in store, wherewith he might wage soldiers
  4. (transitive) To conduct or carry out (a war or other contest).
    • John Dryden (1631-1700)
      [He pondered] which of all his sons was fit / To reign and wage immortal war with wit.
    • Isaac Taylor (1787–1865)
      The two are waging war, and the one triumphs by the destruction of the other.
  5. (transitive) To adventure, or lay out, for hire or reward; to hire out.
    • Edmund Spenser (c.1552–1599)
      Thou [] must wage thy works for wealth.
  6. (obsolete, law, Britain) To give security for the performance of.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Burrill to this entry?)
Usage notes[edit]
  • "Wage" collocates strongly with "war", leading to expressions such as To wage peace, or To wage football implying the inclusion of a large element of conflict in the action.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

wage

  1. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of wagen

German[edit]

Verb[edit]

wage

  1. First-person singular present of wagen.
  2. First-person singular subjunctive I of wagen.
  3. Third-person singular subjunctive I of wagen.
  4. Imperative singular of wagen.

Middle Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Dutch wāga, from Proto-Germanic *wēgō.

Noun[edit]

wâge f

  1. weight
  2. a certain weight, of which the exact value varied
  3. weighing scale
  4. weighhouse

Inflection[edit]

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • waghe (I)”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • wage (I)”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, 1929

Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Northern French wage, from Frankish *waddī, from Proto-Germanic *wadją. Doublet of gage and wed.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

wage (plural wages)

  1. A wage; earnings.
  2. Money reserved for the payment of salaries.
  3. An earned positive consequence.
  4. A promise, pact, or agreement.
Related terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Northern French wagier.

Verb[edit]

wage

  1. Alternative form of wagen

Old French[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Old Norse vágr.

Noun[edit]

wage f (oblique plural wages, nominative singular wage, nominative plural wages)

  1. wave (moving part of a liquid, etc.)

Etymology 2[edit]

see gage

Noun[edit]

wage m (oblique plural wages, nominative singular wages, nominative plural wage)

  1. Alternative form of gage