notorious

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Medieval Latin nōtōrius (widely or fully known), from nōtus (known), perfect passive participle of nōscō (get to know). First attested 1548. Negative sense appeared in the 17th century.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

notorious (comparative more notorious, superlative most notorious)

  1. Widely known, especially for something negative; infamous.
    Synonyms: ill-famed, infamous
    Antonym: famous
    • 1920 May 27, F[rancis] Scott Fitzgerald, “The Offshore Pirate”, in Flappers and Philosophers, New York, N.Y.: Charles Scribner’s Sons, published September 1920, OCLC 623621399, part I, page 6:
      This is the last straw. In your infatuation for this man—a man who is notorious for his excesses, a man your father would not have allowed to so much as mention your name—you have reflected the demi-monde rather than the circles in which you have presumably grown up.
    • 1936, Rollo Ahmed, The Black Art, London: Long, page 156:
      Simon Forman was notorious in his day, and was a many of many reverses.

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