obedient

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English obedient, from Old French obedient, from Latin oboediēns, present active participle of oboediō (obey).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

obedient (comparative more obedient, superlative most obedient)

  1. Willing to comply with the commands, orders, or instructions of those in authority.
    Jessica was so intensely obedient of her parents that her brother sometimes thought she was a robot.

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Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

obedient (plural obedients)

  1. One who obeys.
    • 2002, John Michael Doris, Lack of Character: Personality and Moral Behavior (page 48)
      Damn the obedients and hail the defiants if you will; the experiment does not motivate confidence about how particular subjects would behave in markedly dissimilar situations.

Further reading[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin oboediēns, present active participle of oboediō (obey).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

obedient (masculine and feminine plural obedients)

  1. obedient
    Antonym: desobedient

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Latin[edit]

Verb[edit]

obēdient

  1. third-person plural future active indicative of obēdiō

Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin oboediēns, present active participle of oboediō (obey).

Adjective[edit]

obedient m (oblique and nominative feminine singular obedient or obediente)

  1. obedient

Declension[edit]