ostrich

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English[edit]

An ostrich and chick (probably Struthio camelus australis)

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English ostrich, ostriche, ostryche, ostrige, borrowed from Anglo-Norman ostrige and Old French ostruce, from Vulgar Latin *austruthio, from Latin avis (bird) + strūthiō (ostrich), from Ancient Greek στρουθίων (strouthíōn), or shortened from strūthiocamēlus, from Ancient Greek στρουθιοκάμηλος (strouthiokámēlos), from στρουθός (strouthós, sparrow) + κάμηλος (kámēlos, camel). Compare Spanish avestruz.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈɒs.tɹɪt͡ʃ/, /ˈɒs.tɹɪd͡ʒ/; enPR: ŏs'trĭch, ŏs'trĭj
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈɔs.tɹɪt͡ʃ/, /ˈɑs.tɹɪt͡ʃ/, /ˈɔs.tɹɪd͡ʒ/, /ˈɑs.tɹɪd͡ʒ/; enPR: ôs'trĭch, ŏs'trĭch, ôs'trĭj, ŏs'trĭj
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Noun[edit]

ostrich (plural ostriches)

  1. A large flightless bird (Struthio camelus) native to Africa.
  2. (figuratively) One who buries one's head in the sand instead of acknowledging problems

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Anglo-Norman ostrige and Old French ostruce, from Vulgar Latin *austrūthiō.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈɔstritʃ/, /ˈɔstridʒ/

Noun[edit]

ostrich (plural ostriches)

  1. ostrich (Struthio camelus)
  2. (rare) A goblet made of an ostrich egg.
  3. (rare, heraldry) A heraldic image of an ostrich.

Descendants[edit]

  • English: ostrich
  • Scots: ostriche (obsolete)

References[edit]