emu

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English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Probably from Portuguese ema ((originally) cassowary; giant rhea; (now) ostrich).[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

emu (plural emus)

  1. (obsolete) A cassowary (genus Casuarius). [from early 17th c.]
    • 1656, John Tradescant [the elder], “Some Kindes of Birds Their Egges, Beaks, Feathers, Clawes, and Spurres”, in Musæum Tradescantianum: Or, A Collection of Rarities. Preserved at South-Lambeth neer London by John Tradescant, London: Printed by John Grismond, and are to be sold by Nathanael Brooke [], OCLC 216906535, pages 1 and 3:
      [page 1] 1. EGGES. Caſſawary, or Emeu, vide Aldrov: p. 542. Harveum, G.A. p. 61. [] [page 3] 4. CLAWES. [] A legge and claw of the Caſſawary or Emeu that dyed at S. James’s, Weſtminſter.
    • 1752, John Hill, “CASUARIUS. [The Cassowary.]”, in An History of Animals. [], London: Printed for Thomas Osborne, [], OCLC 937937885, page 482:
      It is a native both of the Eaſt and Weſt Indies; and all the writers on birds have deſscribed it. Aldrovand [Ulisse Aldrovandi] calls it Emeu ſive Eme; Boulius, Emeu vulgo Caſoarius; and others, Caſſuarus.
  2. A large flightless bird native to Australia, Dromaius novaehollandiae. [from 18th c.]
    • 1791, Oliver Goldsmith, “The Emu”, in An History of the Earth, and Animated Nature. [...] In Eight Volumes, volume V, new edition, London: Printed for F. Wingrave, successor to Mr. [John] Nourse, [], OCLC 877622212, pages 59 and 60:
      [page 59] The Emu, though not ſo as large as the oſtrich, is only ſecond to it in magnitude. It is by much the largeſt bird in the New Continent; and is generally found to be ſix feet high, meaſuring from its head to the ground. [] [page 60] [T]he emu runs with ſuch a ſwiftneſs, that the fleeteſt dogs are thrown out in the purſuit.
    • 1829, “The Progress of Zoology”, in T[homas] Crofton Croker, editor, The Christmas Box. An Annual Present to Young Persons, London: John Ebers and Co. 27 Old Bond Street; Philadelphia, Pa.: Thomas Wardle, OCLC 22874885, page 176:
      From New Holland the emeu, / With his better moiety, / Has paid a visit to the Zo- / ological Society.
    • 1864 June 4, William Bennett, “Acclimation and Breeding of Emeus (Dromius irroratus, Bartlett) in Surrey”, in Edward Newman, editor, The Zoologist: A Popular Miscellany of Natural History, volume XXII, London: John Van Voorst, [], OCLC 863367188, chapter II:
      I left my young emeus [] just parted from their affectionate father, and not yet fully reconciled to beginning the world on their own account.
    • 1873, Anthony Trollope, “Wool”, in Australia and New Zealand. [...] In Two Volumes, volume II, London: Chapman and Hall, [], OCLC 654597953, pages 219–220:
      A stranger cannot but remark, throughout the pastoral districts of Australia, how seldom he sees sheep as he travels along. [] It may be that he will also expect emus and kangaroos, and he will generally be disappointed also in regard to them. Kangaroos I certainly have seen in great numbers, though by no means so often as I expected. An emu running wild I never did see. Tame emus round the houses in towns are very common, and of emus’ eggs there is a plethora.
    • 2015, Sankar Chatterjee, “The Avian Revolution Begins”, in The Rise of Birds: 225 Million Years of Evolution, 2nd edition, Baltimore, Md.: Johns Hopkins University Press, →ISBN, page 191:
      Both cassowaries and emus are large, flightless, cursorial birds with diminutive wings. [] Emus, the world's second largest living birds, live in Australia and are the only extant member of the genus Dromaius.

Alternative forms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From e(lectro)m(agnetic) u(nit).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

emu (plural emu)

  1. (physics) Initialism of electromagnetic unit.
    Synonym: EMU
    • 1941, Henry A[ugustus Perkins], E[dward] U[hler] Condon, editor, College Physics (Prentice-Hall Physics Series), New York, N.Y.: Prentice-Hall, OCLC 905516951, page 403:
      A bar magnet NS has poles of strength 144 emu, 5 cm apart.
    • 1962, “Abstracts of Papers Submitted for the Meeting in Houston: November 12–14, 1962”, in Geological Society of America: Abstracts for 1962: Abstracts of Papers Submitted for Six Meetings with which the Society was Associated (Special GSA Papers), New York, N.Y.: Geological Society of America, published 1963, OCLC 150169710, page 141:
      Rock Magnetic Properties as Related to a Magnetometer Profile for Serpentines, Sierra Nevada, California / DuBOIS, ROBERT L., Dept. Geology, University of Arizona, Tucson, Ariz. / The remanent magnetism of a suite of specimens from a serpentine mass in the Sierra Nevada, California, has a declination of N. 32°E. and an inclination of plus 84°. The average intensity is 80 × 10−5 emu/cc.
    • 1974, William Berkson, “Maxwell’s Field Theory”, in Fields of Force: The Development of a World View from Faraday to Einstein, London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, →ISBN; republished Abingdon, Oxon.; New York, N.Y.: Routledge, 2014, →ISBN, page 168:
      The amount of charge named by one emu is that which produces a unit magnetic effect when flowing in a current at one unit length per second.
    • 1976, John Aloysius O’Keefe, Tektites and Their Origin (Developments in Petrology; 4), Amsterdam; New York, N.Y.: Elsevier Scientific Pub. Co., OCLC 123143184, page 109:
      Early investigations showed no detectable magnetic intensity in tektite glass, at the level of about 10−4 emu/g. (To convert measurements in emu/g to S.I., multiply by 103.)
    • 2005, Peter Mohn, “Experimental Basis of Ferromagnetism”, in Magnetism in the Solid State: An Introduction (Solid-State Sciences), Berlin: Springer-Verlag, →ISBN, ISSN 0171-1873, page 39:
      Experimentally the magnetic moment is usually given in units of emu/g, emu/cm3 or emu/mole.

Further reading[edit]

Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From emu(lator).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

emu (plural emus)

  1. (computing, video games, informal) Clipping of emulator.
    • 2005 February 24, Dane L. Galden, “Could this be used for classic emus on GBA?”, in rec.games.video.classic, Usenet[1], message-ID <9XkTd.5830$Ba3.2608@newsread2.news.atl.earthlink.net>:
      Saw this article for playing downloadable games on GBA. It's an official Nintendo product in Japan, and thought it might be useful for Nintendo to release actual emus and some of their older game properties (beyond the $20 classic series).

Translations[edit]

Further reading[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ emu, n.”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1891; James A. H. Murray [et al.], editor (1884–1928), “Emeu, emu”, in A New English Dictionary on Historical Principles (Oxford English Dictionary), volume III (D–E), London: Clarendon Press, OCLC 15566697, page 120, column 3.

Anagrams[edit]


Czech[edit]

Noun[edit]

emu m

  1. emu (large flightless bird native to Australia)

Esperanto[edit]

Verb[edit]

emu

  1. imperative of emi

Finnish[edit]

Noun[edit]

emu

  1. emu (Dromaius novaehollandiae, the only extant species in its genus)

Declension[edit]

Inflection of emu (Kotus type 1/valo, no gradation)
nominative emu emut
genitive emun emujen
partitive emua emuja
illative emuun emuihin
singular plural
nominative emu emut
accusative nom. emu emut
gen. emun
genitive emun emujen
partitive emua emuja
inessive emussa emuissa
elative emusta emuista
illative emuun emuihin
adessive emulla emuilla
ablative emulta emuilta
allative emulle emuille
essive emuna emuina
translative emuksi emuiksi
instructive emuin
abessive emutta emuitta
comitative emuineen

Galician[edit]

Noun[edit]

emu m (plural emus)

  1. emu

Hungarian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈɛmu]
  • Hyphenation: e‧mu

Noun[edit]

emu (plural emuk)

  1. emu

Declension[edit]

Inflection (stem in long/high vowel, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative emu emuk
accusative emut emukat
dative emunak emuknak
instrumental emuval emukkal
causal-final emuért emukért
translative emuvá emukká
terminative emuig emukig
essive-formal emuként emukként
essive-modal
inessive emuban emukban
superessive emun emukon
adessive emunál emuknál
illative emuba emukba
sublative emura emukra
allative emuhoz emukhoz
elative emuból emukból
delative emuról emukról
ablative emutól emuktól
Possessive forms of emu
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. emum emuim
2nd person sing. emud emuid
3rd person sing. emuje emui
1st person plural emunk emuink
2nd person plural emutök emuitek
3rd person plural emujük emuik

Japanese[edit]

Romanization[edit]

emu

  1. Rōmaji transcription of えむ
  2. Rōmaji transcription of エム

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English emu, from Portuguese ema (rhea).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

emu m (plural emus)

  1. emu

Related terms[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Noun[edit]

emu c

  1. an emu

Declension[edit]

Declension of emu 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative emu emun emuer emuerna
Genitive emus emuns emuers emuernas