poitrine

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

French poitrine or a Middle or Old French predecessor.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (anglicized) IPA(key): /ˈpɔɪ.tɹin/
  • (gallicized) IPA(key): /ˌpwɑˈtɹin/

Noun[edit]

poitrine (plural poitrines)

  1. (historical) The breastplate of a knight's armour.
  2. Synonym of poitrel (chest-armor for a horse)
    • 1924, Albert Frederick Calvert, Spain: An Historical and Descriptive Account of Its Architecture, Landscape, and Arts, page 58:
      The horse-armour of the harnesses (A37-38), on the contrary, seems to have been made for the Emperor Maxmilian, [] The ear-coverings of the one are shaped like rams ' horns, and the poitrine, or breast-plate, is embossed with grotesque faces.
    • 1936, Frank Gair Macomber, Arms and Armor, Oriental and European Examples of the XV to XVIII Centuries: Valuable Gothic and Renaissance Tapestries
      IMPORTANT Suit of TURKISH HORSE ARMOR XV Century
      Composed of : chanfron, neck defences, poitrine, croupiere and side pieces of rectangular plates of steel joined by riveted links of mail; saddle, bridle, and stirrups.
  3. Chest, bosom, especially of a woman.
    • 2018, Jerome Bixby, Devilish Tales: A collection of droll, teasing and very wicked fantasies, Digital Parchment Press
      Full red lips and a patrician nose, and a delicately formed but ample poitrine that curled Pierre's hands into iron hooks beneath the counter. "Forgive me, kind sir," she said, in a voice like music in a bedroom, []
    • 2008, Leslie Carroll, Royal Affairs: A Lusty Romp Through the Extramarital Adventures That Rocked the British Monarchy, Penguin (→ISBN), page 326:
      Her bodices fully covered her ample poitrine right up to her nonexistent neck.
    • 2010, Dick Cavett, Talk Show: Confrontations, Pointed Commentary, and Off-Screen Secrets, Macmillan (→ISBN)
      (She points to her ID badge, situated on her ample poitrine, allowing my next unforgivable remark.) DC: Men don't have those.

Related terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French peitrine, from Vulgar Latin *pectorīna from the Classical Latin pectus. Gradually replaced pis, now meaning udder. Compare Spanish pretina (waistband), which is cognate.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /pwa.tʁin/
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

poitrine f (plural poitrines)

  1. chest (of body)
    Il a la poitrine velue.
    (please add an English translation of this usage example)
  2. breast (of body)
  3. breast (of poultry, as meat)

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]