skive

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search
See also: šķīve and šķīvē

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Probably from French esquiver (slink away).

Verb[edit]

skive (third-person singular simple present skives, present participle skiving, simple past and past participle skived)

  1. (Britain, informal) To avoid one's lessons or, sometimes, work. Chiefly at school or university.
    • 2006, The Economist, Young offenders: Arrested development
      Truancies, rather bewilderingly, have risen among children on the programme; the government hopes this is because children skive more as they get older.

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

skive (plural skives)

  1. (Britain, informal) Something very easy, where one can slack off without penalty.
    Mr Smith's history classes are a total skive.
  2. (Britain, informal) An act of avoiding lessons or work.
    • 2007, Anthony McGowan, Henry Tumour, ISBN 009948823X, page 8:
      I got the bus to school, and the driver gave me the eye, thinking I was on the skive, and I started to explain that there was something up with my head, but then I couldn't be bothered.
    • 2011, Catherine Forde, Sugarcoated, ISBN 1405249358:
      Another school skive! I only realised this when my dentist's receptionist told me to expect a fair wait till I could be seen.
    • 2011, Ian Stewart, ‎Jack Cohen, & ‎Terry Pratchett, The Science Of Discworld II: The Globe, ISBN 140702261X, page 202:
      But at least they preserved the idea that books were important and that reading and writing were more than just a skive for people too weedy to hack at one another with swords.

Etymology 2[edit]

Probably from Dutch schijf (slice)[1], probably influenced by shive.

Cognate to English shive, German Scheibe (slice), Old Norse skífa (to cut into slices, slice).

Noun[edit]

skive (plural skives)

  1. A rotating iron disk coated with oil and diamond dust used to polish the facets of a diamond.
    • 1820, Robert Jameson, A System of Mineralogy, in which Minerals are Arranged According to the Natural History Method, page 18:
      This accident sometimes occasions a flaw in the diamond, and always damages the skive, by tearing up its surface.
    • 1827, ‎Thomas Gill, Gill's technological Repository; or Discoveries and Improvements in the Useful Arts, page 10:
      When the cut diamond is fixed in the dop, and that is adjusted in the tongs, the stone is placed upon the skive, which, being set in motion, if the diamond be examined in the course of from ten to fifteen minutes time, the facet will appear to have lost a part of the gray colour it had obtained from the process of cutting, and a brilliant lustre or polish will begin to appear, which is solely produced from the imbedded powder with which the surface of the skive is charged.
    • 1838, Lewis Feuchtwanger, A Treatise on Gems: In Reference to Their Practical and Scientific Value, page 36:
      There is room on the skive for three or four Diamonds at the same time ; and, to give each its proper share of attention, is as much as one person can well manage.
  2. An angled cut or bevel at the edge of something.
    • 2004, Alon Marcus, Foundations for Integrative Musculoskeletal Medicine, ISBN 1556435401, page 534:
      There would be no need for medial heel skive and the heel cup can be of normal depth.
    • 2010, Paul Frowen, ‎Maureen O'Donnell, & ‎J. Gordon Burrow, Neale's Disorders of the Foot, ISBN 0702044288, page 446:
      The angle and the depth of skives should be specified.
    • 2013, F. Y. Golding, The Manufacture Of Boots And Shoes, ISBN 1446548082:
      The skive may be gradually brought to a "feather edge" in such a manner that when turned in it may, together with the leather of the body, be of the substance of the original.

Verb[edit]

skive (third-person singular simple present skives, present participle skiving, simple past and past participle skived)

  1. To pare or shave off the rough or thick parts of.
    • 2009, Geoffrey A. Ozin, ‎André C. Arsenault, & ‎Ludovico Cademartiri, Nanochemistry: A Chemical Approach to Nanomaterials, ISBN 184755895X:
      In the leather industry skive has another connotation, concerning splitting the skin perpendicularly to its thickness into thin layers. Imagine now being able to skive at the nanoscale.
    • 2011, Paul Carpenter, The Leather lace Bullwhip, ISBN 1447885562, page 31:
      Following the photo above from top to bottom, round off each end and skive the flesh side then using an old chisel the same width of the lace, cut a hole – open this out and thread each lace into the opposing hole – pull tight gently and flatten with a rubber hammer or other item, but gently.
    • 2013, F. Y. Golding, The Manufacture Of Boots And Shoes, ISBN 1446548082:
      When two pieces of leather have to be overlapped they must be suitably skived.
    • 2013, Daniel H. Kim, ‎Alexander R. Vaccaro, ‎& Curtis A. Dickman, Surgical Anatomy and Techniques to the Spine E-Book, ISBN 1455723266, page 135:
      An oblique view of the operative field may predispose the surgeon to skive unilaterally toward a vertebral artery.

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Noun[edit]

skive c (singular definite skiven, plural indefinite skiver)

  1. slice, shive

Inflection[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse skífa

Noun[edit]

skive m, f (definite singular skiva or skiven, indefinite plural skiver, definite plural skivene)

  1. a disc (UK) or disk (US)
  2. a washer (small disc with a hole in the middle)
  3. a slice (e.g. slice of bread)

Derived terms[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse skífa

Noun[edit]

skive f (definite singular skiva, indefinite plural skiver, definite plural skivene)

  1. a disc (UK) or disk (US)
  2. a washer (as above)
  3. a slice (e.g. slice of bread)

Derived terms[edit]