supple

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See also: Supple

English[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

From Middle English souple, from Old French souple, soupple (soft, lithe, yielding), from Latin supplic-, supplex (suppliant, submissive, kneeling), of uncertain formation. Either from sub + plicō (bend) (compare complex), or from sub + plācō (placate). More at sub-, placate.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

supple (comparative suppler, superlative supplest)

  1. pliant, flexible, easy to bend
  2. lithe and agile when moving and bending
    supple joints; supple fingers
  3. compliant; yielding to the will of others
    a supple horse

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

supple (third-person singular simple present supples, present participle suppling, simple past and past participle suppled)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To make or become supple.
    • 1693, John Dryden, Examen Poeticum
      The stones [] suppl'd into softness as they fell.
    • (Can we date this quote by Edmund Spenser and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      The flesh therewith she suppled and did steep.
  2. (transitive) To make compliant, submissive, or obedient.
    • 1693, [John Locke], “§78”, in Some Thoughts Concerning Education, London: [] A[wnsham] and J[ohn] Churchill, [], OCLC 1161614482:
      a mother persisting till she had bent her daughter's mind and suppled her will
    • (Can we date this quote by Isaac Barrow and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?), Of contentment, patience and resignation to the will of God
      They should supple our stiff wilfulness.

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Verb[edit]

supplē

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of suppleō