tenure

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Anglo-Norman, from Old French tenure, from Vulgar Latin *tenitura, from *tenitus, from Latin tentus (from teneō) + -ura.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

tenure ‎(plural tenures)

  1. A status of possessing a thing or an office; an incumbency.
    • Cowper
      All that seems thine own, / Held by the tenure of his will alone.
  2. A period of time during which something is possessed.
  3. A status of having a permanent post with enhanced job security within an academic institution.
  4. A right to hold land under the feudal system.

Synonyms[edit]

  • (a status of possessing a thing or an office): incumbency

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Verb[edit]

tenure ‎(third-person singular simple present tenures, present participle tenuring, simple past and past participle tenured)

  1. (transitive) To grant tenure, the status of having a permanent academic position, to (someone).

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

tenure f ‎(plural tenures)

  1. (historical) tenure (right to hold land under the feudal system)

Anagrams[edit]

External links[edit]


Old French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

tenure f ‎(oblique plural tenures, nominative singular tenure, nominative plural tenures)

  1. tenure (right to hold land under the feudal system)
  2. holding (of land); estate
  3. tenure, right of possession
    • 1283, Philippe de Beaumanoir, Les Coutumes de Beauvaisis, available in page 237 of this document
      le longue tenure qu'il alliguent ne lor vaut riens
      The long tenure that they are claiming is worth nothing to them

References[edit]