trespass

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK) enPR: trĕs'pəs, IPA(key): /ˈtɹɛspəs/
    • (file)
  • (US) enPR: trĕs'pǎs, IPA(key): /ˈtɹɛspæs/

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed into Middle English trespas, from Old French trespas (passage; offense against the law), from trespasser.

Noun[edit]

trespass (countable and uncountable, plural trespasses)

  1. (law) An intentional interference with another's property or person.
    • 2019 December 18, Andrew Roden, “New measurements reveal improvement in punctuality”, in Rail, page 24:
      External infrastructure issues such as severe weather and trespass caused 17.1% of [train] cancellations, [...].
    • 2020 June 17, “Stop & Examine”, in Rail, page 71:
      Network Rail has produced a free downloadable comic highlighting the consequences of railway trespass. Between March 23 and April 26, there were 1,024 trespass incidents on the railway. [...] it is based on the company's award-winning safety film 18, which shows the dangers of trespass, especially around electrified lines.
  2. (archaic) sin
Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old French trespasser (to go across or over, transgress), from tres- (across, over) + passer (to pass).

Verb[edit]

trespass (third-person singular simple present trespasses, present participle trespassing, simple past and past participle trespassed)

  1. (intransitive, now rare) To commit an offence; to sin.
    Synonym: transgress
  2. (transitive, obsolete) To offend against, to wrong (someone).
    • 1526, Bible, tr. William Tyndale, Matthew 6:14
      And forgeve us oure trespases, even as we forgeve them which trespas us.
  3. (intransitive) To go too far; to put someone to inconvenience by demand or importunity; to intrude.
    Synonym: cross the line
    to trespass upon the time or patience of another
    • 1813Jane Austen. Pride and Prejudice.
      "Indeed I have, sir," was her answer. "She is a great deal too ill to be moved. Mr. Jones says we must not think of moving her. We must trespass a little longer on your kindness."
  4. (law) To enter someone else's property illegally.
  5. (obsolete) To pass beyond a limit or boundary; hence, to depart; to go.
    Synonyms: exceed, surpass, transcend
  6. (transitive) To decree that a person shall be arrested for trespassing if he or she returns to someone else's land.
    The dean trespassed the streaker from his university.
    • 2012 June 21, Greg O'Connor, “Criminal trespasses police officers”, in Stuff[1]:
      The entire police force has in effect been trespassed from a Wellington property to stop officers checking whether a heavy-sleeping offender is complying with an overnight bail curfew.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]