passer

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See also: Passer and pâsser

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

pass +‎ -er

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

passer (plural passers)

  1. One who succeeds in passing a test, etc.
    • 2008, David L. Streiner, ‎Geoffrey R. Norman, Health Measurement Scales
      The distributions of scores on the exam for passers and failers are plotted []
  2. (sports) Someone who passes, someone who makes a pass.
    1. (American football) A football player who makes a forward pass, who may be (but not limited to) the quarterback.
  3. (chess) A passed pawn.
  4. (archaic) One who passes; a passer-by.
    • 1904, National Magazine (volume 20, page 147)
      Passers stopped and began to stare. A policeman was approaching up the street. Dave dodged back into the cab and banged the door.
  5. (sociology) One who is able to "pass", or be accepted as a member of a race, sex or other group to which society would not otherwise regard them as belonging.
    • 2003, Brooke Kroeger, Passing: When People Can't Be Who They Are
      Explores the history, literature, and sociology of passing, and provides case studies of six individuals who are "passers," including a black man who passed as a white Jew and a lesbian naval officer who passed as straight.
    • 2014, Risa Bear, Homecomings, page 69:
      Passers and would-be passers make every effort to be convincing in their chosen gender role []

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From German Passer.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /pasər/, [ˈpʰasɐ]

Noun[edit]

passer c (singular definite passeren, plural indefinite passere)

  1. compass, pair of compasses
  2. dividers
  3. calipers
Inflection[edit]

See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

See passere (to pass).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /paseːr/, [pʰaˈseɐ̯ˀ]

Verb[edit]

passer or passér

  1. imperative of passere

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)

Noun[edit]

passer m (plural passers, diminutive passertje n)

  1. compass (device used with a pencil to draw an arc or circle on paper)

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French passer, from Vulgar Latin *passāre, from Latin passus, past participle of pando (I stretch, I spread out). Compare Italian passare, Spanish pasar, Portuguese passar.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

passer

  1. to go past
  2. to cross (a border)
  3. (law) to pass
    passer une loito pass a law
  4. to spend (time)
    J'ai passé les vacances en Espagne.
    I spent the holidays in Spain.
    J'ai passé une splendide soirée chez toi.
    I had a great evening at your place.
  5. to publish (a newspaper)
  6. (transitive) to take, to sit (an exam or test)
    J'ai réussi à l'examen que j'avais passé en avril.
    I passed the exam that I took in April.
  7. (intransitive) to pass (an exam or test)
    Il est passé à l'examen.
    He passed the exam.
  8. (dated) (transitive) to pass (an exam or test)
    Il a passé l'examen.
    He passed the exam.
  9. (public transportation) to run
    Le train passe toutes les vingt minutes.
    The train runs every 20 minutes.
  10. to exceed (a limit)
  11. to percolate
  12. to hand down, to pass on
  13. to be allowed
  14. (intransitive) to pass, to go (between two entities)
    • 1908, Gaston Leroux, Le Mystère de la chambre jaune, 2009 edition, Wikisource, chapter 1:
      L’assassin n’avait donc pas passé par là et ne pouvait se sauver par là [...]
  15. (transitive) to show (a movie)
  16. to go up (a grade)
  17. to shift (change gear)
    1. to go down
    2. to go up
  18. to stop by, to pop in
    Je vais y passer demain pour mes affaires.
    I'm going to stop by there tomorrow for my things.
  19. to pass away, to die
  20. (music) to spin (e.g. a disk)
  21. (TV) to show (be on television)
  22. (sports) to pass (kick, throw, hit etc. the ball to another player)
  23. (athletics) to pass (the relay baton)
  24. to pass on (infect someone else with a disease)
  25. (transitive) to put, to place, to slip (move a part of one's body somewhere else)
    • 1908, Gaston Leroux, Le Mystère de la chambre jaune, 2009 edition, Wikisource, chapter 1:
      [...] et, par-dessus les volets, les barreaux intacts, des barreaux à travers lesquels vous n’auriez pas passé le bras…
      • 1908, anonymous, Margaret Jull Costa (editor), The Mystery of the Yellow Room, 2003 edition (Dedalus, →ISBN:
        [...] and, as well as those shutters, there were iron bars so close together that you could not even have got your arm through them.
  26. to wipe, rub
    Elle passe de la crème sur son ventre.
    She's rubbing cream on her belly.
  27. to skip a go
  28. to put (make something undergo something)
  29. (card games) to pass (not play upon one's turn)
  30. (reflexive) to take place, to happen, to come to pass.
  31. (reflexive, for time) to go by
  32. (reflexive, with de) to do without
    Je ne peux pas me passer du café le matin.
    I can't do without a cup of coffee in the morning.

Usage notes[edit]

  • This verb uses the auxiliary verb avoir when used transitively (or with a transitive sense, even when the complement is omitted); otherwise (when it is intransitive), it uses être.

Conjugation[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Ladin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Vulgar Latin *passō, from Latin passus.

Verb[edit]

passer

  1. to proceed

Conjugation[edit]

  • Ladin conjugation varies from one region to another. Hence, the following conjugation should be considered as typical, not as exhaustive.

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *p(e)t-tro- (who flies, bird), from *peth₂- (to fly). Related to penna.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

passer m (genitive passeris); third declension

  1. sparrow
    • c. 84 BCE – 54 BCE, Catullus, Carmina 3.3-4
      passer mortuus est meae puellae / passer, deliciae mea puellae

Inflection[edit]

Third declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative passer passerēs
genitive passeris passerum
dative passerī passeribus
accusative passerem passerēs
ablative passere passeribus
vocative passer passerēs

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • passer in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • passer in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • passer in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • De Vaan, Michiel (2008) Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill, page 449

Middle French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French passer.

Verb[edit]

passer

  1. to pass; to go by
    • 15th century, Rustichello da Pisa (original author), Mazarine Master (scribe), The Travels of Marco Polo, page 3, line 2:
      Cy aprés parle comment les deux freres passerent le desert

Conjugation[edit]

  • Middle French conjugation varies from one text to another. Hence, the following conjugation should be considered as typical, not as exhaustive.

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • passer on Dictionnaire du Moyen Français (1330-1500) (in French)

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Verb[edit]

passer

  1. imperative of passere
  2. present tense of passe

Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Vulgar Latin *passāre < Latin passus (a step, pace, footstep, track).

Verb[edit]

passer

  1. to pass; to pass by

Conjugation[edit]

This verb conjugates as a first-group verb ending in -er. The forms that would normally end in *-ss, *-sss, *-sst are modified to s, s, st. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.

Descendants[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • pass in The Century Dictionary, The Century Co., New York, 1911