passus

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See also: Passus

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

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Noun[edit]

passus ‎(plural passuses)

  1. A section of a long narrative poem; a canto

Latin[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Perfect passive participle of pandō ‎(I spread out [to dry]).

Participle[edit]

passus m ‎(feminine passa, neuter passum); first/second declension

  1. dried
Declension[edit]

First/second declension.

Number Singular Plural
Case / Gender Masculine Feminine Neuter Masculine Feminine Neuter
nominative passus passa passum passī passae passa
genitive passī passae passī passōrum passārum passōrum
dative passō passō passīs
accusative passum passam passum passōs passās passa
ablative passō passā passō passīs
vocative passe passa passum passī passae passa
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From pandō +‎ -tus.

Noun[edit]

passus m ‎(genitive passūs); fourth declension

  1. step
  2. pace
  3. pace: a Roman unit of length equal to 5 Roman feet
Declension[edit]

Fourth declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative passus passūs
genitive passūs passuum
dative passuī passibus
accusative passum passūs
ablative passū passibus
vocative passus passūs
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Perfect active participle of patior.

Participle[edit]

passus m ‎(feminine passa, neuter passum); first/second declension

  1. suffered, having suffered
  2. allowed, having allowed
  3. permitted, having permitted
Declension[edit]

First/second declension.

Number Singular Plural
Case / Gender Masculine Feminine Neuter Masculine Feminine Neuter
nominative passus passa passum passī passae passa
genitive passī passae passī passōrum passārum passōrum
dative passō passō passīs
accusative passum passam passum passōs passās passa
ablative passō passā passō passīs
vocative passe passa passum passī passae passa
Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • 1. passus in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • 2. passus in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • passus in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • PASSUS in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • passus in Félix Gaffiot (1934), Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • a mile away: a mille passibus
    • with dishevelled hair: passis crinibus
  • passus in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • passus in Ramminger, Johann (accessed 16 July 2016) Neulateinische Wortliste: Ein Wörterbuch des Lateinischen von Petrarca bis 1700[2], pre-publication website, 2005-2016
  • passus in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin passus ‎(step).

Noun[edit]

passus c

  1. A short section (e.g. a few connected words or sentences) of a written or oral presentation; a "passage" (in a book, etc.); an "item" (of a presentation)
  2. A short elaboration on an item of a presentation not belonging to the main subject

Inflection[edit]

Inflection of passus 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative passus passusen passusar passusarna
Genitive passus passusens passusars passusarnas

References[edit]