unfair

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English[edit]

English Wikipedia has articles on:
Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English unfair (unattractive, unseemly), from Old English unfæġer (not fair, not beautiful, foul, ugly, horrid), equivalent to un- +‎ fair.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

unfair (comparative unfairer, superlative unfairest)

  1. (rare or archaic) not beautiful; uncomely; unattractive
  2. (archaic or obsolete) sorrowful; sad
  3. (archaic) unseemly; disgraceful
  4. not fair, unjust
    • 2012 March-April, John T. Jost, “Social Justice: Is It in Our Nature (and Our Future)?”, in American Scientist[1], volume 100, number 2, page 162:
      He draws eclectically on studies of baboons, descriptive anthropological accounts of hunter-gatherer societies and, in a few cases, the fossil record. With this biological framework in place, Corning endeavors to show that the capitalist system as currently practiced in the United States and elsewhere is manifestly unfair.
    It was unfair for the boss to give larger bonuses to his friends.
    Antonyms: fair, just

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Verb[edit]

unfair (third-person singular simple present unfairs, present participle unfairing, simple past and past participle unfaired)

  1. (transitive, obsolete) to make ugly
    Synonym: devenustate

Anagrams[edit]


German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From un- +‎ fair.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈʊnfɛːɐ̯/ (standard; used naturally in western Germany and Switzerland)
  • IPA(key): /ˈʊnfeːɐ̯/ (overall more common; particularly northern and eastern regions)
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: un‧fair

Adjective[edit]

unfair (comparative unfairer, superlative am unfairsten)

  1. unfair
    Synonyms: unlauter, ungerecht
    Antonym: fair

Declension[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • unfair in Duden online
  • unfair” in Digitales Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache