bistro

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See also: Bistro, bistrô, and bistrò

English[edit]

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"At the Bistro," painting by Jean Beraud

Etymology[edit]

Attested from c. 1920, from the French bistro(t) with the original meaning "proprietor of a tavern" (1880s), of Unknown origin, presumably regional French dialect.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bistro (plural bistros)

  1. A small European-style restaurant.
  2. A small bar or pub.

Synonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

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See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

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Pronunciation[edit]

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Noun[edit]

bistro c (singular definite bistroen, plural indefinite bistroer)

  1. A bistro.

Inflection[edit]


Finnish[edit]

Noun[edit]

bistro

  1. bistro

Declension[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

The legend of the origin of the word due to the Russian occupation in 1814.

The etymology is unclear, and is presumed to come from a regional word: bistro, bistrot, bistingo, or bistraud, a word in the Poitou dialect which means a "lesser servant." Another offered is bistouille or bistrouille, a colloquial term from the northern area of France,[1] which is a mixture of brandy and coffee; precisely the kind of beverage that could be served at a bistro. The first recorded use of the word appears in 1884,[2], and again in 1892 ("bistrot").

A popular folk etymology of the word claims that it originated among Russian troops who occupied Paris following the Napoleonic wars. In taverns they would shout the Russian быстро (býstro, "quickly") to the waiters, so that "bistro" took on the meaning of a place where food was served quickly.[3] This etymology is rejected, due to the 69 year gap between the proposed origin and the first attestation. In Russia restaurants are not traditionally called bistros, and the concept of the fast-serving restaurant as used in Russian is seen as a French import, unrelated to the supposed Russian origin.

External links[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bistro m (plural bistros)

  1. bistro

References[edit]

  1. ^ Glenn Randall Mack, Asele Surina. Food Culture In Russia And Central Asia. ISBN 0313327734. Page 154.
  2. ^ Robert K. Barnhart. The Barnhart Dictionary of Etymology. ISBN 0824207459. Page 94.
  3. ^ Scarborough, Jack. The Origins of Cultural Differences and Their Impact on Management. ISBN 1567201237. Page 172; Joseph, Nadine. Passport France. World Trade Press, 1997. Page 84.

Italian[edit]

Noun[edit]

bistro m (plural bistri)

  1. bistre

Verb[edit]

bistro

  1. first-person singular present indicative of bistrare

Verb[edit]

bistro

  1. first-person singular present indicative of bistrare

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French bistro.

Noun[edit]

bìstrō m (Cyrillic spelling бѝстро̄)

  1. bistro

Declension[edit]