cantor

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English[edit]

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A Cantor singing

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin cantor, agent noun from perfect passive participle cantus, from verb canere (to sing), + agent suffix -or.

Noun[edit]

cantor (plural cantors)

  1. singer, especially someone who takes a special role of singing or song leading at a ceremony
    The cantor's place in church is on the right of the choir

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Asturian[edit]

Noun[edit]

cantor m (plural cantores)

  1. singer (person who sings)

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Latin[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From canō (I sing) +‎ -tor.

Noun[edit]

cantor m (genitive cantōris); third declension

  1. singer (male)
Inflection[edit]

Third declension.

Number Singular Plural
nominative cantor cantōrēs
genitive cantōris cantōrum
dative cantōrī cantōribus
accusative cantōrem cantōrēs
ablative cantōre cantōribus
vocative cantor cantōrēs
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Inflected form of cantō (I sing).

Verb[edit]

cantor

  1. first-person singular present passive indicative of cantō

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin cantor (male singer), cantōrem.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cantor m (plural cantores, feminine cantora, feminine plural cantoras)

  1. singer

Related terms[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin cantor, cantōrem.

Adjective[edit]

cantor m (feminine cantora, masculine plural cantores, feminine plural cantoras)

  1. singing

Noun[edit]

cantor m (plural cantores, feminine cantora)

  1. singer

Related terms[edit]


Venetian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin cantor, cantōrem.

Noun[edit]

cantor m (plural cantori) or cantor m (plural canturi)

  1. singer, chorister