canto

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

canto (plural cantos)

  1. One of the chief divisions of a long poem; a book.

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Asturian[edit]

Verb[edit]

canto

  1. first-person singular present indicative of cantar

Catalan[edit]

Verb[edit]

canto

  1. first-person singular present indicative form of cantar

Galician[edit]

Noun[edit]

canto m (uncountable)

  1. singing

Verb[edit]

canto

  1. first-person singular present indicative of cantar

Interlingua[edit]

Noun[edit]

canto (plural cantos)

  1. song

Italian[edit]

Phonetik.svg This entry needs pronunciation information. If you are familiar with the IPA then please add some!

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin cantus.

Noun[edit]

canto m (plural canti)

  1. song
  2. singing
Related terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Ostensibly from Greek κανθός, meaning corner, specifically the corner of the eye.

Noun[edit]

canto m (plural canti)

  1. corner
  2. side
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From cantare

Verb[edit]

canto

  1. first-person singular present indicative of cantare

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Frequentative form from canō

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

present active cantō, present infinitive cantāre, perfect active cantāvī, supine cantātum

  1. I sing.

Inflection[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Portuguese canto, from Latin cantus (song; singing), perfect passive participle of canō (I sing), from Proto-Indo-European *kan- (to sing). Cognate of English chant

Noun[edit]

canto m (plural cantos)

  1. singing (the act of using the voice to produce musical sounds)
  2. chant
  3. a bird’s song
  4. (figuratively) any pleasant sound
  5. (poetry) canto
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

canto

  1. First-person singular (eu) present indicative of cantar

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin canthus, from Ancient Greek κανθός (kanthós, corner of the eye).

Noun[edit]

canto m (plural cantos)

  1. corner (space in the angle between converging lines or surfaces)
  2. a remote location
  3. an undetermined or unknown location
  4. (sports) the corner of the goal line and touchline
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Spanish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin cantus.

Noun[edit]

canto m (plural cantos)

  1. singing
  2. song
  3. chant
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin cantus, metal rim of a wheel, of Celtic origin

Noun[edit]

canto m (plural cantos)

  1. edge
  2. side
  3. (rare) thickness
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Verb[edit]

canto

  1. First-person singular (yo) present indicative form of cantar, I sing