fele

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See also: felé

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English feele, fele, from Old English feola, fela (much, many, very), from Proto-Germanic *felu (very, much), from Proto-Indo-European *pélu (many). Cognate with Scots fele (many, much, great), Dutch veel (much, many), German viel (much, many), Latin plūs (more), Ancient Greek πολύς (polús, many). Related to full.

Adverb[edit]

fele

  1. (dialectal or obsolete) Greatly, much, very
    For they bring in the substance of the Beere / That they drinken feele too good chepe, not dere.Hakluyts Voyages.

Adjective[edit]

fele (comparative feler, superlative felest)

  1. (dialectal or obsolete) Much; many.
    Any maner of thynges desyryt..heraftyr may be had and ygrawnt by the fellyst of the sayd comynes. — dated 1456 from J.T. Gilbert, Calendar of Ancient Records of Dublin , vol. 1 (1889)

Derived terms[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

fele

  1. (dialectal or obsolete) Many (of).
    • 1485, Sir Thomas Malory, Le Morte Darthur, Book V:
      And fele of thy footmen ar brought oute of lyff, and many worshypfull presoners ar yolden into oure handys.

Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Hungarian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈfɛlɛ/
  • Hyphenation: fe‧le

Etymology 1[edit]

Postposition[edit]

fele

  1. (dialectal) in the direction of, around (variant of felé)

Etymology 2[edit]

Adjective[edit]

fele (not comparable)

  1. half (of the)
    A fele gond az enyém. - Half (of) the trouble is mine.

Noun[edit]

fele

  1. possessive third-person singular, singular possession of fél (half)
    A pénz fele az enyém - Half of the money is mine.

Declension[edit]


Latin[edit]

Noun[edit]

fēle

  1. ablative singular of fēlēs

Old Irish[edit]

Verb[edit]

fele (relative)

  1. Alternative form of fil.