jade

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See also: Jade, jáde, jäde, and jadę

English[edit]

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Wikipedia

A jadeite ball

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From French le jade, error for earlier l'ejade (jade), from Spanish piedra de ijada (flank stone), via Vulgar Latin *iliata from Latin ilia (flank) (Jade was thought to cure pains in the side.).[1]

Noun[edit]

jade (usually uncountable, plural jades)

  1. (uncountable) A semiprecious stone either nephrite or jadeite, generally green or white in color, often used for carving figurines.
    • 2012 March 1, Lee A. Groat, “Gemstones”, American Scientist, volume 100, number 2, page 128: 
      Although there are dozens of different types of gems, among the best known and most important are diamond, ruby and sapphire, emerald and other gem forms of the mineral beryl, chrysoberyl, tanzanite, tsavorite, topaz and jade.
  2. A bright shade of slightly bluish or greyish green, typical of polished jade stones.
    jade colour:    
Derived terms[edit]
See also[edit]
Translations[edit]

Adjective[edit]

jade (not comparable)

  1. Of a grayish shade of green, typical of jade stones.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English, either a variant of yaud[2] or merely influenced by it. Yaud derives from Old Norse jalda (mare), from a Finno-Ugric language, such as Moksha эльде (elʹde) or Erzya эльде (elʹde).[3][4] See yaud for more.

Noun[edit]

jade (plural jades)

  1. A horse too old to be put to work.
  2. (chiefly pejorative) A woman.

Synonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

jade (third-person singular simple present jades, present participle jading, simple past and past participle jaded)

  1. To tire, weary or fatigue
    • John Locke
      The mind, once jaded by an attempt above its power, [] checks at any vigorous undertaking ever after.
  2. (obsolete) To treat like a jade; to spurn.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Shakespeare to this entry?)
  3. (obsolete) To make ridiculous and contemptible.
    • Shakespeare
      I do now fool myself, to let imagination jade me.
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ jade” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary (2001).
  2. ^ Eric Partridge, Origins: A Short Etymological Dictionary of Modern English (ISBN 1134942168, 2006)
  3. ^ Per Thorson, Anglo-Norse studies: an inquiry into the Scandinavian elements in the modern English dialects, volume 1 (1936), page 52: "Yad sb. Sc Nhb Lakel Yks Lan, also in forms yaad, yaud, yawd, yoad, yod(e).... [jad, o] 'a work-horse, a mare' etc. ON jalda 'made', Sw. dial. jäldä, from Finnish elde (FT p. 319, Torp p. 156 fol.). Eng. jade is not related."
  4. ^ Saga Book of the Viking Society for Northern Research, page 18: "There is thus no etymological connection between ME. jāde MnE. jade and ME. jald MnE. dial. yaud etc. But the two words have influenced each other mutually, both formally and semantically."

Danish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /jaːdə/, [ˈjæːð̩]

Noun[edit]

jade c (singular definite jaden, uncountable)

  1. (mineralogy) jade

Finnish[edit]

Finnish Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia fi

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

jade

  1. (mineralogy) jade

Declension[edit]


French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

jade m (plural jades)

  1. jade

Anagrams[edit]

External links[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Noun[edit]

jade m (plural jades)

  1. jade (gem)

Spanish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

jade m (plural jades)

  1. jade