kenning

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English, derivative of Middle English kennen (to know, perceive). Compare Danish kjending (acquaintance). More at ken.

Noun[edit]

kenning (plural kennings)

  1. (obsolete) Sight; view; a distant view at sea.
  2. (obsolete) Range or extent of vision, especially at sea; (by extension) a marine measure of approximately twenty miles.
  3. As little as one can recognise or discriminate; a small portion; a little.
    put in a kenning of salt

Verb[edit]

kenning

  1. Present participle of ken.

Etymology 2[edit]

From ken (to beget, bring forth).

Noun[edit]

kenning (plural kennings)

  1. The tread of an egg; cicatricula.

Etymology 3[edit]

From Old Norse, from kenna (know, perceive), from Proto-Germanic *kannijaną, causative of *kunnaną (to know how). Compare can, ken, keen.

Noun[edit]

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

kenning (plural kennings)

  1. A metaphorical phrase used in Germanic poetry (especially Old English or Old Norse) whereby a simple thing is described in an allusive way, such as ‘whale road’ for ‘sea’, or ‘enemy of the mast’ for ‘wind’.
Translations[edit]

Icelandic[edit]

Icelandic Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia is

Noun[edit]

kenning f (genitive singular kenningar, nominative plural kenningar)

  1. a theory
  2. a religious doctrine, teaching
  3. a lesson
  4. (poetry) a kenning; (a circumlocution used instead of an ordinary noun in Old Norse, Old English and later Icelandic poetry)

Derived terms[edit]