spare

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English spare, spar, from Old English spær (sparing, scant), from Proto-Germanic *sparaz (compare Dutch spaarzaam, German sparsam, German spärlich, Swedish sparsam, Icelandic sparr (sparing)), from Proto-Indo-European *sper- (cf. Latin prosper ‘lucky’, Old Church Slavonic sporŭ ‘plentiful’, Albanian shperr ‘to earn money’, Persian سپار (sepār) ‘entrust; deposit’, Ancient Greek sparnós ‘rare’, Sanskrit sphirá ‘thick’).

Adjective[edit]

spare (comparative sparer, superlative sparest)

  1. scanty; not abundant or plentiful.
    a spare diet
    • 2012 May 24, Nathan Rabin, “Film: Reviews: Men In Black 3”, The Onion AV Club:
      Jones’ sad eyes betray a pervasive pain his purposefully spare dialogue only hints at, while the perfectly cast Brolin conveys hints of playfulness and warmth while staying true to the craggy stoicism at the character’s core.
  2. sparing; frugal; parsimonious; chary.
    • Carew
      He was spare, but discreet of speech.
  3. Being over and above what is necessary, or what must be used or reserved; not wanted, or not used; superfluous.
    I have no spare time.
    • Spenser
      if that no spare clothes he had to give
  4. Held in reserve, to be used in an emergency.
    a spare anchor; a spare bed or room
  5. lean; wanting flesh; meager; thin; gaunt.
    • Shakespeare
      O, give me the spare men, and spare me the great ones.
  6. (obsolete, UK, dialect) slow
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Grose to this entry?)
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

spare (plural spares)

  1. The act of sparing; moderation; restraint.
    • Holland
      Killing for sacrifice, without any spare.
  2. Parsimony; frugal use.
    • Spenser
      Poured out their plenty without spite or spare.
  3. An opening in a petticoat or gown; a placket.
  4. That which has not been used or expended.
  5. A spare part, especially a spare tire.
  6. (bowling) The right of bowling again at a full set of pins, after having knocked all the pins down in less than three bowls. If all the pins are knocked down in one bowl it is a double spare; in two bowls, a single spare.
  7. (bowling) The act of knocking down all remaining pins in second ball of a frame; this entitles the pins knocked down on the next ball to be added to the score for that frame.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English sparen, sparien, from Old English sparian (to spare, show mercy to, refrain from injuring or destroying), from Proto-Germanic *sparōną, *sparjaną (to save, keep, spare), from Proto-Indo-European *sper- (to be productive, earn). Cognate with Scots spar, spare, spair (to spare), West Frisian sparje (to save, spare), Dutch sparen (to save, spare), German sparen (to save, conserve, economise), Swedish spara (to save, save up), Icelandic spara (to save, conserve).

Verb[edit]

spare (third-person singular simple present spares, present participle sparing, simple past and past participle spared)

  1. To show mercy.
    1. (intransitive) To desist; to stop; to refrain.
    2. (intransitive) To refrain from inflicting harm; to use mercy or forbearance.
    3. (transitive) To preserve from danger or punishment; to forbear to punish, injure, or harm; to show mercy.
  2. To keep.
    1. (intransitive) To be frugal; not to be profuse; to live frugally; to be parsimonious.
      • (Can we date this quote?) Alexander Pope (1688-1744)
        I, who at some times spend, at others spare, / Divided between carelessness and care.
    2. (transitive) To keep to oneself; to forbear to impart or give.
      Spare the rod and spoil the child.
      • (Can we date this quote?) John Milton
        [Thou] thy Father's dreadful thunder didst not spare.
      • (Can we date this quote?) Bible, Proverbs xvii. 27
        He that hath knowledge, spareth his words.
    3. (transitive)} To save or gain, as by frugality; to reserve, as from some occupation, use, or duty.
      • (Can we date this quote?) Knolles
        All the time he could spare from the necessary cares of his weighty charge, he bestowed on [] serving of God.
  3. (transitive) (to give up): To deprive oneself of, as by being frugal; to do without; to dispense with; to give up; to part with.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Roscommon
      Where angry Jove did never spare / One breath of kind and temperate air.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Shakespeare
      I could have better spared a better man.
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 22, The Mirror and the Lamp:
      Not unnaturally, “Auntie” took this communication in bad part. [] Next day she [] tried to recover her ward by the hair of the head. Then, thwarted, the wretched creature went to the police for help; she was versed in the law, and had perhaps spared no pains to keep on good terms with the local constabulary.
Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From English spare.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /spɛːr/, [ˈsb̥æːɐ̯]

Noun[edit]

spare c (singular definite sparen, plural indefinite spare or spares)

  1. (bowling) spare (the act of knocking down all remaining pins in second ball of a frame)
Inflection[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse spara.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /spaːrə/, [ˈsb̥ɑːɑ]

Verb[edit]

spare (imperative spar, infinitive at spare, present tense sparer, past tense sparede, past participle er/har sparet)

  1. save
  2. spare
  3. economize
  4. save up

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

spare

  1. singular present subjunctive of sparen

German[edit]

Verb[edit]

spare

  1. First-person singular present of sparen.
  2. First-person singular subjunctive I of sparen.
  3. Third-person singular subjunctive I of sparen.
  4. Imperative singular of sparen.

Italian[edit]

Verb[edit]

spare

  1. third-person singular present indicative of sparere

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Noun[edit]

spare

  1. vocative singular of sparus