stound

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English stond, stounde, stound (hour, time, season, moment), from Old English stund (a period of time, while, hour, occasion), from Proto-Germanic *stundō (point in time, hour), from Proto-Indo-European *stut- (prop), from Proto-Indo-European *stā-, *sth- (to stand). Cognate with Dutch stond (hour, time, moment), German Stunde (hour), Danish and Swedish stund (time, while). Compare Middle English stunden (to linger, stay, remain for a while), Icelandic stunda (to frequent, pursue). Related to stand.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

stound (plural stounds)

  1. (chronology, obsolete) An hour.
    • 1765, Percy's Reliques, The King and the Tanner of Tamworth (original license: 1564):
      What booth wilt thou have? our king reply'd / Now tell me in this stound
  2. (obsolete) A tide, season.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Chaucer to this entry?)
  3. (archaic or dialectal) A time, length of time, hour, while.
    • 1801, Walter Scott, The Talisman:
      He lay and slept, and swet a stound, / And became whole and sound.
  4. (archaic or dialectal) A brief span of time, moment, instant.
    Listen to me a little stound.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Chaucer to this entry?)
  5. A moment or instance of urgency; exigence.
  6. (dialectal) A sharp or sudden pain; a shock, an attack.
    • 1857, Alexander Maclaren, Expositions of Holy Scripture:
      No wonder that they cried unto the Lord, and felt a stound of despair shake their courage
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, II.viii:
      ere the point arriued, where it ought, / That seuen-fold shield, which he from Guyon brought / He cast betwene to ward the bitter stound [...].
  7. A fit, an episode or sudden outburst of emotion; a rush.
    • 1895, Mansie Wauch, The Life of Mansie Wauch: tailor in Dalkeith:
      [...] and run away with him, almost whether he will or not, in a stound of unbearable love!
  8. astonishment; amazement
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Spenser to this entry?)
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Gay to this entry?)
Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

stound (third-person singular simple present stounds, present participle stounding, simple past and past participle stounded)

  1. (obsolete or dialectal, intransitive) To hurt, pain, smart.
    • 1819, John Keats, Otho the Great, Act IV, Scene II, verses 93-95
      Your wrath, weak boy ? Tremble at mine unless
      Retraction follow close upon the heels
      Of that late stounding insult […]
  2. (obsolete or dialectal, intransitive) To be in pain or sorrow, mourn.
  3. (obsolete or dialectal, intransitive) To long or pine after, desire.
    • 1823, Edward Moor, Suffolk words and phrases: or, An attempt to collect the lingual localisms of that county:
      Recently weaned children "stound after the breast."

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English stunden (to linger, stay, remain for a while). Cognate with Icelandic stunda (to frequent, pursue). More at stand.

Verb[edit]

stound (third-person singular simple present stounds, present participle stounding, simple past and past participle stounded)

  1. (intransitive, obsolete) To stand still; stop.
  2. (intransitive, UK dialectal) To stop to listen; pause.

Noun[edit]

stound (plural stounds)

  1. (UK dialectal) A stand; a stop.

Etymology 3[edit]

Middle English stound, stonde, stoonde, ston, from Old English stond (a stand). Compare stand.

Noun[edit]

stound (plural stounds)

  1. A receptacle for holding small beer.

Anagrams[edit]