сорок

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Russian[edit]

Russian cardinal numbers
 <  39 40 41  > 
    Cardinal : со́рок (sórok)
    Ordinal : сороково́й (sorokovój)

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old East Slavic сорокъ (sorokŭ, a bunch of 40 sable pelts; forty), displaced четꙑредесѧте (četyredesęte, forty) (< Proto-Slavic *četyre desęte (forty)).

Further etymology is unclear. In the past regarded as borrowed from Byzantine Greek σαράκοντα (sarákonta, 40), but this etymology is problematic for phonetic and semantic reasons. The older meaning is a bunch of sable pelts. May be related to соро́чка (soróčka); compare Old Norse serkr (shirt; 200 furs), archaic Slovak mera (40) from Hungarian mérő (sack).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈsorək]
  • (file)

Numeral[edit]

со́рок (sórok)

  1. forty (40)
Declension[edit]

Usage notes[edit]

сорок (sorok) in the nominative case and accusative case governs the genitive plural of the noun. In other cases, it governs the corresponding plural case of the noun.

Derived terms[edit]

Coordinate terms[edit]

References[edit]

Vasmer, Max (1964–1973), “сорок”, in Etimologičeskij slovarʹ russkovo jazyka [Etymological Dictionary of the Russian Language] (in Russian), translated from German and supplemented by Oleg Trubačóv, Moscow: Progress

Etymology 2[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

соро́к (sorókf anim pl

  1. genitive plural of соро́ка (soróka)
  2. accusative plural of соро́ка (soróka)

Ukrainian[edit]

Ukrainian cardinal numbers
 <  39 40 41  > 
    Cardinal : сорок (sorok)
    Ordinal : сороко́вий (sorokóvyj)

Etymology[edit]

From Old East Slavic сорокъ (sorokŭ, a bunch of 40 sable pelts), cognates include Russian со́рок (sórok) and Belarusian со́рак (sórak); further origin is unknown.

Pronunciation[edit]

Numeral[edit]

со́рок (sórok)

  1. forty (40)

Declension[edit]

Coordinate terms[edit]