Martin

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See also: martin and Martín

English[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

From Latin Martinus (of or like Mars" or "little Mars), Mars, Martis + -inus (diminutive suffix.

Furthermore, the name Mars is likely to have been brought into Latin from elsewhere, likely the Etruscan Maris which was their name for the same deity.

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Martin

  1. A male given name originally given in honor of a fourth century soldier-saint.
    • 1593, William Shakespeare, King Henry VI, Part 1, Act I:Scene 2:
      Expect Saint Martin's summer, halcyon days, / Since I have entered into these wars.
    • 1767 Laurence Sterne, Tristram Shandy, Book IV ( Slawkenbergius's Tale ):
      Luther was not born in the year 1483, but in 84; and not on the 22nd day of October, but on the 10th of November, the eve of Martinmas day, from whence he had the name of Martin. - - - Now you see, brother Toby, he would say, looking up, "that christian names are not such indifferent things;" - Had Luther here been called by any other name but Martin, he would have been damned to all eternity - Not that I look upon Martin, he would add, as a good name - far from it - 'tis something better than a neutral, and but a little - yet little as it is, you see it was of some service to him.
    • 1933 Eleanor Farjeon, Over the Garden Wall, Faber and Faber, page 90 ("Boys' Names")
      What splendid names for boys there are! / There's Carol like a rolling car, / And Martin like a flying bird,/
    • 2006 Kate Atkinson, One Good Turn, Black Swan(2007), ISBN 9780552772440, page 81:
      Martin was pretty dull as names went but 'Alex Blake' had a certain dash to it. His publishers hadn't considered Martin's own name to be 'punchy' enough.
  2. A patronymic surname​.
  3. An English habitational surname for someone who lived near a mere.

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]


Czech[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin Martinus (of or like Mars" or "little Mars), Mars, Martis + -inus (diminutive suffix). Cognate to English Martin.

Proper noun[edit]

Martin m

  1. A male given name. Feminine form: Martina.

Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin Martinus (of or like Mars" or "little Mars), Mars, Martis + -inus (diminutive suffix). Cognate to English Martin.

Proper noun[edit]

Martin

  1. A male given name.

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • [1] Danskernes Navne, based on CPR data: 58 178 males with the given name Martin have been registered in Denmark between about 1890 (=the population alive in 1967) and January 2005, with the frequency peak in the 1980s. Accessed on 19 June 2011.

Estonian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin Martinus (of or like Mars" or "little Mars), Mars, Martis + -inus (diminutive suffix). Cognate to English Martin.

Proper noun[edit]

Martin

  1. A male given name.

Related terms[edit]


Finnish[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Martin

  1. Genitive singular form of Martti.

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin Martinus (of or like Mars" or "little Mars), Mars, Martis + -inus (diminutive suffix). Cognate to English Martin.

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Martin m

  1. A male given name. Feminine form: Martine.
  2. A patronymic surname​.

Anagrams[edit]


German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin Martinus (of or like Mars" or "little Mars), Mars, Martis + -inus (diminutive suffix). Cognate to English Martin.

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Martin

  1. A male given name.
  2. A patronymic surname​.

Related terms[edit]


Norwegian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin Martinus (of or like Mars" or "little Mars), Mars, Martis + -inus (diminutive suffix). First recorded in Norway ca. 1200. Cognate with English Martin.

Proper noun[edit]

Martin

  1. A male given name.

Usage notes[edit]

  • The most common given name of men born in Norway in the 1990s.

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • Kristoffer Kruken - Ola Stemshaug: Norsk personnamnleksikon, Det Norske Samlaget, Oslo 1995, ISBN 82-521-4483-7
  • [2] Statistisk sentralbyrå, Namnestatistikk: 20 132 males with the given name Martin living in Norway on January 1st 2011, with the frequency peak in the 1990s. Accessed on April 29th, 2011.

Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin Martinus (of or like Mars" or "little Mars), Mars, Martis + -inus (diminutive suffix).

Proper noun[edit]

Martin m (nominative singular Martins)

  1. A male given name, cognate to Martin in Modern English

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin Martinus (of or like Mars" or "little Mars), Mars, Martis + -inus (diminutive suffix). Cognate to English Martin.

Proper noun[edit]

Martin

  1. A male given name.

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • Roland Otterbjörk: Svenska förnamn, Almqvist & Wiksell 1996, ISBN 91-21-10937-0
  • [3] Statistiska centralbyrån and Sture Allén, Staffan Wåhlin, Förnamnsboken, Norstedts 1995, ISBN 9119551622: 72 420 males with the given name Martin living in Sweden on December 31st, 2010, with the frequency peak in the 1980s. Accessed on 19 June 2011.