abominable

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English abhomynable, from Old French abominable, from Late Latin abōminābilis (deserving abhorrence), from abōminor (abhor, deprecate as an ill omen), from ab (from, away from) + ōminor (forebode, predict, presage), from ōmen (sign, token, omen). Formerly erroneously folk-etymologized as deriving from Latin ab- + homo and therefore spelled abhominable, abhominal; see those entries for more.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (US) IPA(key): /əˈbɑm.ə.nə.bl̩/, /əˈbɑm.nə.bl̩/
  • (General New Zealand) IPA(key): /ɘˈbɔm.ɘ.nɘ.bɯ/
  • (file)

Adjective[edit]

abominable (comparative more abominable, superlative most abominable)

  1. Worthy of, or causing, abhorrence, as a thing of evil omen; odious in the utmost degree; very hateful; detestable; loathsome; execrable. [first attested around 1150 to 1350][1]
    • — Revelation 21:8 (KJV)
      But the fearful, and unbelieving, and the abominable, and murderers, and whoremongers, and sorcerers, and idolaters, and all liars, shall have their part in the lake which burneth with fire and brimstone: which is the second death.
  2. (obsolete) Excessive, large (used as an intensifier).
    • (Can we date this quote by George Perkins Marsh and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      Note: Juliana Berners ... informs us that in her time (15th century), "abomynable syght of monkes" was elegant English for "a large company of friars".
  3. Very bad or inferior.
  4. Disagreeable or unpleasant. [First attested in the late 19th century.][1]

Usage notes[edit]

  • Nouns to which "abominable" is often applied: man, woman, crime, act, deed, sin, vice, character, place, mystery, treatment, church, bride, snowman.

Alternative forms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

References[edit]

  1. 1.0 1.1 “abominable” in Lesley Brown, editor-in-chief; William R. Trumble and Angus Stevenson, editors, The Shorter Oxford English Dictionary on Historical Principles, 5th edition, Oxford; New York, N.Y.: Oxford University Press, 2002, →ISBN, page 6.

Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Late Latin abōminābilis.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

abominable (masculine and feminine plural abominables)

  1. abominable

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Late Latin abōminābilis (abominable, detestable).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

abominable (plural abominables)

  1. Absolutely loathsome; abominable.
  2. Exceedingly bad or ugly; abominable.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Galician[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Late Latin abōminābilis.

Adjective[edit]

abominable m or f (plural abominables)

  1. abominable

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Adjective[edit]

abominable

  1. Alternative form of abhomynable

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Late Latin abōminābilis.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /abomiˈnable/, [aβomiˈnaβle]

Adjective[edit]

abominable (plural abominables)

  1. abominable

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]