balsam

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See also: Balsam

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English *balsam, balsme, from Old English balsam, balsamum (balsam, balm), from Latin balsamum, from Ancient Greek βάλσαμον (bálsamon, balsam), of Semitic origin.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

balsam (countable and uncountable, plural balsams)

  1. (chiefly Britain) A sweet-smelling oil or resin derived from various plants.
  2. (chiefly Britain) A plant or tree yielding such substance.
  3. (chiefly Britain) A soothing ointment.
  4. (chiefly Britain, figuratively) Something soothing.
    Classical music is a sweet balsam for our sorrows
  5. A flowering plant of the genus Impatiens.
  6. The balsam family of flowering plants (Balsaminaceae), which includes Impatiens and Hydrocera.
  7. A balsam fir Abies balsamea.
  8. Canada balsam, a turpentine obtained from the resin of balsam fir.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

See also[edit]

Verb[edit]

balsam (third-person singular simple present balsams, present participle balsaming, simple past and past participle balsamed)

  1. (transitive) To treat or anoint with balsam.

Anagrams[edit]


Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish balsam(m), balsaim(e), from Latin balsamum, from Ancient Greek βάλσαμον (bálsamon).

Noun[edit]

balsam m (genitive singular balsaim)

  1. (medicine) balsam, balm
  2. balsam (plant)

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
balsam bhalsam mbalsam
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]


Polish[edit]

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Etymology[edit]

From Old Polish balsam or balszam, from Latin balsamum, from Ancient Greek βάλσαμον (bálsamon, balsam).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

balsam m inan

  1. (technical) balsam (a sweet-smelling oil or resin derived from various plants)
  2. (cosmetics, medicine, pharmacology) lotion (a low-viscosity topical preparation intended for application to skin)
  3. (historical) a substance used in thanatopraxy (embalming of corpses), specifically any substance used for this practice in Ancient Egypt.
  4. (figuratively) balsam (something soothing)

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • balsam in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin balsamum. Appears since 17th century.

Noun[edit]

balsam n (plural balsamuri)

  1. balsam (clarification of this definition is being sought)
  2. unction, balm, salve, unguent

Derived terms[edit]