bible

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: Bible

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English bible, from Middle Latin biblia (book) (misinterpreted as a feminine from earlier Latin neuter plural biblia (books)), from Ancient Greek βιβλία (biblía, books), plural of βιβλίον (biblíon, small book), originally a diminutive of βίβλος (bíblos, book), from βύβλος (búblos, papyrus) (from the ancient Phoenician city of Byblos which exported this writing material).

Old English used biblioþēce (from βιβλιοθήκη) and ġewritu (> English writs) for "the Scriptures".

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /ˈbaɪbəl/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -aɪbəl

Noun[edit]

bible (plural bibles)

  1. Alternative letter-case form of Bible (a specific version, edition, translation, or copy of the Christian religious text)
    • 2012 September 8, Cass Jones, “Elvis Presley's bible sells for £59,000”, in The Guardian[1]:
      The bible was used by Presley throughout his life until his death on 16 August 1977 and contains his handwritten notes, thoughts and annotations.
  2. Alternative letter-case form of Bible (the analogous holy book of another religion)
    • 1925, Etsu Inagaki Sugimoto, A Daughter of the Samurai, page 76:
      The Buddhist bible tells this story of Buddha’s time of temptation when he was living as a hermit on the Mount of Snow.
  3. (by extension) A comprehensive manual that describes something, or a publication with a loyal readership.
    handyman’s bible
    • 1995 June, Gary Wolf, “The Curse of Xanadu”, in Wired Magazine[2]:
      Computer Lib was written as a popular primer, but its most profound effect was on computer programmers, who needed little persuasion about the value of computers. [] Having set out to appeal to the general public, Nelson managed to publish an insider's bible and highly intimate guide to hacker culture.
    • 1995 September, Richard Barbrook; Andy Cameron, “The Californian Ideology”, in Mute[3], volume 1, number 3, ISSN 1356-7748:
      For example, Wired—the monthly bible of the ‘virtual class’—has uncritically reproduced the views of Newt Gingrich, []
  4. (nautical) Synonym of holystone: a piece of sandstone used for scouring wooden decks on ships.
  5. (at certain US universities) A compilation of problems and solutions from previous years of a given course, used by some students to cheat on tests or assignments.
    • 1965, Matt Fichtenbaum and Dan Murphy, “The Institute Screw” in The Broadside of Boston, vol. III, No. 22:
      My friend’s a genius, he will give me problems one through nine. The bible of a sophomore will have the needed lines.
  6. Omasum, the third compartment of the stomach of ruminants
    Synonyms: psalterium, omasum, manyplies, fardel
  7. (locksmithing) The upper part of a pin-tumbler lock, containing the driver pins and springs.

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]


Czech[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

bible f

  1. Bible

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • bible in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • bible in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bible f (plural bibles)

  1. bible (comprehensive text)

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French bible, from Medieval Latin biblia, from biblia), from Ancient Greek βιβλία (biblía).

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

bible

  1. The Bible (Christian holy book); a copy of the Bible.
  2. (rare) The Koran (Muslim holy book).

Descendants[edit]

  • English: Bible
  • Scots: Bible

References[edit]

Noun[edit]

bible

  1. Any book that is of extensive length.
  2. A compendium, collection, or storehouse of books.

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]