curd

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See also: Curd

English[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

From Middle English curd, a metathetic variant of crud, crudde (coagulated substance). More at crud.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

curd (countable and uncountable, plural curds)

  1. The part of milk that coagulates when it sours or is treated with enzymes; used to make cottage cheese, dahi, etc.
  2. The coagulated part of any liquid.
  3. The edible flower head of certain brassicaceous plants.
    • (Can we date this quote by R. Thompson and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      Broccoli should be cut while the curd, as the flowering mass is termed, is entire.
    • (Can we date this quote by F. Burr and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      Cauliflowers should be cut for use while the head, or curd, is still close and compact.
    • 2010, Geoff Stebbings, Growing Your Own Fruit and Veg For Dummies, Chichester, W. Sussex: John Wiley & Sons, →ISBN, pages 162–163:
      This beautiful vegetable [Romanesco broccoli] looks rather like a green cauliflower designed by a mathematician and has lime-green 'spiralled' curds. The curds are nutty and tasty, and romanesco is worth growing just for its good looks. You can use romanesco in the same ways that you would normally use cauliflower but the flavour is sweeter and they look far more impressive. I try to leave them in large pieces when serving them because they're so beautiful.

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Verb[edit]

curd (third-person singular simple present curds, present participle curding, simple past and past participle curded)

  1. (intransitive) To form curd; to curdle.
  2. (transitive) To cause to coagulate or thicken; to cause to congeal; to curdle.

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Middle English[edit]

Noun[edit]

curd

  1. Alternative form of crudde