dill

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See also: díll and Dill

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Dill, Antheum graveolens, an herb.
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Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English dile, from Old English dile (dill, anise); cognate with Old Saxon dilli, Dutch dille, Swedish dill, German Dill.

Noun[edit]

dill (countable and uncountable, plural dills)

  1. Anethum graveolens (the type species of the genus Anethum), a herb, the seeds of which are moderately warming, pungent, and aromatic, formerly used as a soothing medicine for children; also known as dillseed.
  2. A cucumber pickled with dill flavoring, also called a dill pickle.
  3. (informal) a fool.
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

dill (third-person singular simple present dills, present participle dilling, simple past and past participle dilled)

  1. To cook or flavor with dill
    • 2014, Anatoly (Tony) Kandiew, Red Devils, →ISBN, page 139:
      My mother would pickle them and dill them, and we still had an abundance of fresh vegetables left.

Etymology 2[edit]

Variant of dull

Verb[edit]

dill (third-person singular simple present dills, present participle dilling, simple past and past participle dilled)

  1. To still; to assuage; to calm; to soothe, as one in pain.
    • 1775, Robert Baillie, Letters and Journals: Written by the deceased Mr. Robert Baillie, Principal of the University of Glasgow, page 252:
      The noise of the Queen's voyage to France is dilled down ; no money for her furniture will be got in haste; and the Cardinal has no will of her mother.
    • 1829, Publications - Issue 25, Volume 2, page x:
      The innocent was punished. The gear is payed and the thieves dilled down.
    • 1829, John Spalding & James Skene, The History of the Troubles and Memorable Transactions in Scotland, page vii:
      The Provincial Assembly sits down. Dr. Guild moderator. Dr. Scroggie preaches. His sermon found faulty. It dills down.
    • 1890, Thomas Nield, Oliver Cromwell, Lord Protector of England: A Drama, page 23:
      And there is nought to call them back, while these Curmudgeon generals dill down in their fear.
    • 1938, Alexander Ross, Scot. Text S, page 195:
      That now the dinn o' it wad soon dill down, An' but a story at the last be found.

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Icelandic[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

dill n (genitive singular dills, no plural)

  1. dill (Anethum graveolens)

Declension[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)

Noun[edit]

dill c (uncountable)

  1. the herb dill

Declension[edit]

Declension of dill 
Uncountable
Indefinite Definite
Nominative dill dillen
Genitive dills dillens

Westrobothnian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse til, from Proto-Germanic *tila- (goal), from Proto-Indo-European *ád (near, at).

Pronunciation[edit]

Particle[edit]

dill

  1. Used to indicate the infinitive form of a verb; compare English to.
    sjwårrt dil o fa-ne dil briinn
    hard to get it to burn

Preposition[edit]

dill

  1. to (indicating destination)
    gakk dill stass
    walk to the city

Adverb[edit]

dill

  1. another, one more
    Ve fing annätókkä dill
    We got an euqal amount thereto

Derived terms[edit]