drake

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Drake and drakę

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /dɹeɪk/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -eɪk

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English drake (male duck, drake), from Old English *draca, abbreviated form for Old English *andraca (male duck, drake, literally duck-king), from Proto-West Germanic *anadrekō (duck leader). Cognate with Middle Dutch andrake (drake), Middle Low German āntreke, āntdrāke, ("male duck, drake"; > Low German drake (drake)), Old High German anutrehho, antrache ("male duck, drake"; > German Enterich (drake)), Swabian Antrech (drake), German dialectal Drache (drake). More at ennet.

Noun[edit]

drake (plural drakes)

  1. A male duck.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English drake (dragon; Satan), from Old English draca (dragon, sea monster, huge serpent), from Proto-Germanic *drakô (dragon), from Latin dracō (dragon), from Ancient Greek δράκων (drákōn, serpent, giant seafish), from δέρκομαι (dérkomai, I see clearly), from Proto-Indo-European *derḱ-. Compare Middle Dutch drake and German Drache.

Noun[edit]

drake (plural drakes)

  1. A mayfly used as fishing bait.
  2. (poetic) A dragon.
    • (Can we date this quote by J. A. Harrison and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      Beowulf resolves to kill the drake.
  3. (historical) A small piece of artillery.
  4. A fiery meteor.
    • c. 1620, anonymous, “Tom o’ Bedlam’s Song” in Giles Earle his Booke (British Museum, Additional MSS. 24, 665):
      The moon’s my constant Mistresse
      & the lowlie owle my morrowe.
      The flaming Drake and yͤ Nightcrowe make
      mee musicke to my sorrowe.
  5. A beaked galley, or Viking warship.
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Noun[edit]

drake

  1. plural of draak

Middle Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Dutch *drako, an early Germanic borrowing of Latin dracō (dragon).

Noun[edit]

drāke m

  1. dragon, wyrm

Inflection[edit]

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Descendants[edit]

  • Dutch: draak
    • Afrikaans: draak
  • Limburgish: draagk, draogk

Further reading[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Ancient Greek δράκων (drákōn) and Old Norse dreki.

Noun[edit]

drake m (definite singular draken, indefinite plural draker, definite plural drakene)

  1. a dragon
  2. a kite

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn
Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse dreki, from Ancient Greek δράκων (drákōn).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

drake m (definite singular draken, indefinite plural drakar, definite plural drakane)

  1. a dragon
  2. a kite
  3. a type of longship decorated with a dragon's head

References[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Swedish draki, from Old Norse dreki, from Proto-Germanic *drakô (dragon), from Latin dracō (serpent), from Ancient Greek δράκων (drákōn, dragon).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

drake c

  1. dragon
  2. kite
  3. a male duck, drake
  4. a belligerent (older) woman; battle-ax

Declension[edit]

Declension of drake 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative drake draken drakar drakarna
Genitive drakes drakens drakars drakarnas

Anagrams[edit]