ende

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See also: Ende, endë, ëndë, endé, ēndé, and -ende

Albanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Historically identical with edhe. Compare Danish end (but), Icelandic enn (still, yet).

Adverb[edit]

ende

  1. still, yet, therefore
Related terms[edit]

Danish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse endi, endir (end), from Proto-Germanic *andijaz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂entíos.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ɛnə/, [ˈɛnə], [ˈɛnn̩]

Noun[edit]

ende c (singular definite enden, plural indefinite ender)

  1. end
  2. point, prong, tine
  3. behind, bottom, buttocks, backside, bum, fanny
Inflection[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse enda (to end).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ɛnə/, [ˈɛnə], [ˈɛnn̩]

Verb[edit]

ende (imperative end, infinitive at ende, present tense ender, past tense endte, perfect tense er/har endt)

  1. end
  2. finish
Synonyms[edit]

Dutch[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • en (standard)

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch ende, from Old Dutch enda, anda, from Proto-Germanic *andi, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂entí. Compare Low German un, German und, West Frisian en, English and, Danish end.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)

Conjunction[edit]

ende

  1. (archaic) and

German[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

ende

  1. First-person singular present of enden.
  2. First-person singular subjunctive I of enden.
  3. Third-person singular subjunctive I of enden.
  4. Imperative singular of enden.

Middle Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Dutch *endi, enda, *ende, from Proto-Germanic *andi.

Alternative forms[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

ende

  1. and
Alternative forms[edit]
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Dutch *endi, ende, einde, from Proto-Germanic *andijaz.

Noun[edit]

ende n

  1. end
Inflection[edit]

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Alternative forms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • ende (II)”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • ende (III)”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • ende (I)”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, 1929
  • ende (II)”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, 1929

Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old English ende, from Proto-Germanic *andijaz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂entíos. Cognate to Middle Dutch ende, einde.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈɛːnd(ə)/, /ˈɛnd(ə)/

Noun[edit]

ende (plural endes)

  1. The end or finishing of a thing; the terminal point of something:
    1. The end of something'e presence; disappearance.
      • a. 1382, John Wycliffe, “Apocalips 1:8”, in Wycliffe's Bible:
        Yhe, Amen! Y am alpha and oo, the bigynnyng and the ende, seith the Lord God, that is, and that was, and that is to comynge, almyȝti.
        You, Amen! I am Alpha and O, the beginning and the end, says the Lord God; that is, that was, and that which will come, almighty.
    2. The end of one's life; death or passing away.
      • 1407, The Testimony of William Thorpe, page 41.
        And herfore of Wicleef speciali and of these men I toke the lore whiche I haue taughte and purpose to lyue aftir, if God wole, to my lyues ende.
    3. The end of a literary piece or work.
    4. The last or final part of something.
    5. The conclusion or aftermath of something.
    6. The irrevocable or last destiny of something.
    7. (rare) A successful conclusion or finishing.
  2. The marginal or outlying part of something:
    1. The extreme terminus or point of an object or thing (including something that was formerly one)
    2. The margins or surrounds of a nation or settlement; the border.
  3. A part of a settlement, province, or nation.
    • late 14th c. Geoffrey Chaucer, The Canterbury Tales. General Prologue: 15-16.
      And specially from every shires ende
      Of Engelond, to Caunterbury they wende,
      And specially from every shire's end
      Of England they to Canterbury went,
  4. The limitations or boundaries of something.
  5. One's ends, aims, goals, or purpose; the direction one chooses.
  6. (rare) A section or portion of something.
  7. (rare) A family member; one's kin.
  8. (rare) The deeper facts or realness of something.
  9. (rare) What makes something important, purposeful or meaningful.
  10. (rare) One of the four cardinal directions.
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old English ened, enid, æned, from Proto-Germanic *anudz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂énh₂ts.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈɛːn(ə)d/, /ˈɛn(ə)d/

Noun[edit]

ende (plural endes)

  1. A duck (usually referring to the female)
Descendants[edit]
References[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Old English endian.

Verb[edit]

ende

  1. Alternative form of enden

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse endi, endir, from Proto-Germanic *andijaz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂entíos.

Noun[edit]

ende m (definite singular enden, indefinite plural ender, definite plural endene) (genitive form endes)

  1. end (extreme part)
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse enda

Verb[edit]

ende (imperative end, present tense ender, simple past endte, past participle endt, present participle endende)

  1. to end

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse endi, endir, from Proto-Germanic *andijaz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂entíos. Akin to English end.

Noun[edit]

ende m (definite singular enden, indefinite plural endar, definite plural endane) (genitive form endes)

  1. end (extreme part)
    • 1856, Ivar Aasen, Norske Ordsprog:
      Langt Liv skal og faa Ende.
      A long life will also have an end.
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

ende (present tense endar, past tense enda, past participle enda, passive infinitive endast, present participle endande, imperative end/ende)

  1. Alternative form of enda

References[edit]


Old Dutch[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *andijaz

Noun[edit]

ende m

  1. an end

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *andijaz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂entíos. Cognate with Old Frisian ende, enda, Old Saxon endi, Old Dutch ende, einde (Dutch einde), Old High German enti (German Ende), Old Norse endir (Swedish ände), Gothic 𐌰𐌽𐌳𐌴𐌹𐍃 (andeis).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ende m

  1. end, limit, border, corner

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin inde (thence).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈende/, [ˈẽn̪d̪e]
  • (file)

Adverb[edit]

ende

  1. thence

Derived terms[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

ende

  1. (the) only (one), masculine form of enda
    du är den ende, som hemligen ser mig
    you are the only one, who secretly sees me

See also[edit]


Turkish[edit]

Noun[edit]

ende

  1. locative singular of en