conclusion

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See also: conclusión

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English, borrowed from Old French conclusion, from Latin conclūsiō, from the past participle stem of conclūdere (to conclude).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /kənˈkluːʒən/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -uːʒən

Noun[edit]

conclusion (plural conclusions)

  1. The end, finish, close or last part of something.
    • 1856-1858, William H. Prescott, History of the Reign of Philip II
      A flourish of trumpets announced the conclusion of the contest.
  2. The outcome or result of a process or act.
  3. A decision reached after careful thought.
    The board has come to the conclusion that the proposed takeover would not be in the interest of our shareholders.
    • 1598–1599 (first performance), William Shakespeare, Much Adoe about Nothing. [], quarto edition, London: [] V[alentine] S[immes] for Andrew Wise, and William Aspley, published 1600, OCLC 932921146, [Act I, scene i]:
      [I]n her boſome Ile vnclaſpe my heart, / And take her hearing priſoner with the force / And ſtrong incounter of my amorous tale: / Then after to her father will I breake, / And the concluſion is, ſhe ſhal be thine, [...]
    • 1992, Rudolf M[athias] Schuster, The Hepaticae and Anthocerotae of North America: East of the Hundredth Meridian, volume V, New York, N.Y.: Columbia University Press, →ISBN, page vii:
      With fresh material, taxonomic conclusions are leavened by recognition that the material examined reflects the site it occupied; a herbarium packet gives one only a small fraction of the data desirable for sound conclusions. Herbarium material does not, indeed, allow one to extrapolate safely: what you see is what you get [...]
  4. (logic) In an argument or syllogism, the proposition that follows as a necessary consequence of the premises.
    • 1716 April 20, Joseph Addison, “The Free-holder: No. 32. Monday, April 9. [1716.] [Julian calendar]”, in The Works of the Right Honourable Joseph Addison, Esq; [], volume IV, London: [] Jacob Tonson, [], published 1721, OCLC 1056445272:
      He granted him both the major and minor, but denied him the conclusion.
  5. (obsolete) An experiment, or something from which a conclusion may be drawn.
  6. (law) The end or close of a pleading, for example, the formal ending of an indictment, "against the peace", etc.
  7. (law) An estoppel or bar by which a person is held to a particular position.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Wharton to this entry?)

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Translations[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French, from Latin conclūsiō, from the past participle stem of conclūdere (conclude).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

conclusion f (plural conclusions)

  1. conclusion

Related terms[edit]

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Further reading[edit]


Interlingua[edit]

Noun[edit]

conclusion (plural conclusiones)

  1. conclusion

Occitan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin conclūsiō.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)

Noun[edit]

conclusion f (plural conclusions)

  1. conclusion

Related terms[edit]