conclude

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English concluden, borrowed from Latin conclūdere (to shut up, close, end), present active infinitive of conclūdō.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /kən.ˈkluːd/
  • (file)

Verb[edit]

conclude (third-person singular simple present concludes, present participle concluding, simple past and past participle concluded)

  1. (intransitive) To end; to come to an end.
    The story concluded with a moral.
    • 1749, Henry Fielding, The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling:
      He inveighed against the folly of making oneself liable for the debts of others; vented many bitter execrations against the brother; and concluded with wishing something could be done for the unfortunate family.
  2. (transitive) To bring to an end; to close; to finish.
    • 1623, Francis Bacon, A Discourse of a War with Spain
      I will conclude this part with the speech of a counsellor of state.
  3. (transitive) To bring about as a result; to effect; to make.
    to conclude a bargain
  4. (transitive) To come to a conclusion, to a final decision.
    From the evidence, I conclude that this man was murdered.
    • a. 1694, John Tillotson, The Advantages of Religion to Societies
      No man can certainly conclude God's love or hatred to any person by anything that befalls him.
  5. (obsolete) To make a final determination or judgment concerning; to judge; to decide.
    • 1717, Joseph Addison, Metamorphoses
      But no frail man, however great or high, / Can be concluded blest before he die.
  6. To shut off; to restrain; to limit; to estop; to bar; generally in the passive.
    The defendant is concluded by his own plea.
    A judgment concludes the introduction of further evidence.
    • 1677, Matthew Hale, The Primitive Origination of Mankind, Considered and Examined According to the Light of Nature
      If therefore they will appeal to revelation for their creation they must be concluded by it.
  7. (obsolete) To shut up; to enclose.
    • 1594, Richard Hooker, Of the Lawes of Ecclesiastical Politie
      The very person of Christ [was] concluded within the grave.
  8. (obsolete) To include; to comprehend; to shut up together; to embrace.
  9. (logic) to deduce, to infer (develop a causal relation)

Antonyms[edit]

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Translations[edit]


Italian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

conclude

  1. third-person singular present indicative of concludere

Latin[edit]

Verb[edit]

conclūde

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of conclūdō