conclude

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English concluden, borrowed from Latin conclūdere (to shut up, close, end), present active infinitive of conclūdō.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /kən.ˈkluːd/
  • (file)

Verb[edit]

conclude (third-person singular simple present concludes, present participle concluding, simple past and past participle concluded)

  1. (intransitive) To end; to come to an end.
    The story concluded with a moral.
    • 1749, Henry Fielding, The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling:
      He inveighed against the folly of making oneself liable for the debts of others; vented many bitter execrations against the brother; and concluded with wishing something could be done for the unfortunate family.
  2. (transitive) To bring to an end; to close; to finish.
    • a. 1627 (date written), Francis [Bacon], “Considerations Touching a VVarre vvith Spaine. []”, in William Rawley, editor, Certaine Miscellany VVorks of the Right Honourable Francis Lo. Verulam, Viscount S. Alban. [], London: [] I. Hauiland for Humphrey Robinson, [], published 1629, OCLC 557721855:
      I will conclude this part with the speech of a counsellor of state.
  3. (transitive) To bring about as a result; to effect; to make.
    to conclude a bargain
  4. (transitive) To come to a conclusion, to a final decision.
    From the evidence, I conclude that this man was murdered.
    • a. 1694, John Tillotson, The Advantages of Religion to Societies
      No man can certainly conclude God's love or hatred to any person by anything that befalls him.
  5. (obsolete) To make a final determination or judgment concerning; to judge; to decide.
    • 1717, Joseph Addison, Metamorphoses
      But no frail man, however great or high, / Can be concluded blest before he die.
  6. To shut off; to restrain; to limit; to estop; to bar; generally in the passive.
    The defendant is concluded by his own plea.
    A judgment concludes the introduction of further evidence.
    • a. 1677, Matthew Hale, The Primitive Origination of Mankind, Considered and Examined According to the Light of Nature, London: [] William Godbid, for William Shrowsbery, [], published 1677, OCLC 42005461:
      If therefore they will appeal to revelation for their creation they must be concluded by it.
  7. (obsolete) To shut up; to enclose.
  8. (obsolete) To include; to comprehend; to shut up together; to embrace; to confine.
  9. (logic) to deduce, to infer (develop a causal relation)

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]


Italian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /konˈklu.de/
  • Rhymes: -ude
  • Hyphenation: con‧clù‧de

Verb[edit]

conclude

  1. third-person singular present indicative of concludere

Latin[edit]

Verb[edit]

conclūde

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of conclūdō

Piedmontese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

conclude

  1. to conclude

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin concludere or Italian concludere.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

a conclude (third-person singular present conclude, past participle conclus3rd conj.

  1. to conclude

Conjugation[edit]

Further reading[edit]