flair

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See also: Flair

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English flayre, from Old French flair (scent, odour), from flairier (to reek, smell), from Latin flāgrō, dissimilated variation of frāgrō (emit a sweet smell, verb). More at fragrant.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

flair (countable and uncountable, plural flairs)

  1. A natural or innate talent or aptitude.
    Synonyms: gift, knack, talent
    to have a flair for art
    • 1999, Lucy Honig, The Truly Needy And Other Stories, University of Pittsburgh Press (→ISBN), page 73:
      The cafard. The cockroach. The French certainly had a flair for labeling their unhappiness. Long ago he had begun to visualize this nagging misery as the insect the word also named.
  2. Distinctive style or elegance.
    Synonyms: elan, elegance, grace, panache, style
    to dress with flair
    • 1999, Jennifer Aniston as Joanna, Office Space, written by Mike Judge:
      You know what, Stan, if you want me to wear 37 pieces of flair, like your pretty boy over there, Brian, why don't you just make the minimum 37 pieces of flair?
  3. (obsolete) Smell; odor.
  4. (obsolete) Olfaction; sense of smell.

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

flair (third-person singular simple present flairs, present participle flairing, simple past and past participle flaired)

  1. (transitive) To add flair.

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From flairer, from Latin flagrare (to blow). Cognate to Portuguese cheiro.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

flair m (plural flairs)

  1. sense of smell
  2. (by extension) intuition, sixth sense

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Old French[edit]

Noun[edit]

flair m (oblique plural flairs, nominative singular flairs, nominative plural flair)

  1. smell; odor
  2. sense of smell

Scots[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English flōr.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

flair (plural flairs)

  1. floor
    • 2008, James Kelman, Kieron Smith, Boy, Penguin 2009, p. 140:
      He skited it over the flair maybe if it was a jotter and it was you to go and get it.

Westrobothnian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse fleiri, from Proto-Germanic *flaizô.

Adjective[edit]

flair

  1. More; comparative of marge (many,) and mang.
  2. Many, several.
    flair i gångenseveral at a time; in plural