hike

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English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

From English dialectal hyke (to walk vigorously), probably a Northern form of hitch, from Middle English hytchen, hichen, icchen (to move, jerk, stir). Cognate with Scots hyke (to move with a jerk), dialectal German hicken (to hobble, walk with a limp), Danish hinke (to hop). More at hick.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /haɪk/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -aɪk

Noun[edit]

hike (plural hikes)

  1. A long walk, usually for pleasure or exercise. [from c. 1900]
    • 1904, P.M. Silloway, “Extracts from Some Montana Note-books, 1904”, in Bulletin of the Cooper Ornithological Club, volume 1-6, Cooper Ornithological Club, page 149:
      Well, if it gave him so much pleasure to find the nest, he is welcome to the eggs. I can hunt another grass tuft, lay another set, and rear my brood in peace while he goes "hiking" after eggs at Flathead.
    • 1992, Allen Mitchell, California Parks Access: A Complete Guide to the State and National Parks for Visitors with Limited Mobility, page 179:
      From here, you can pick up the asphalt bike path and take a hike across the meadow.
    • 2002, Doug Gelbert, The 55 Best Places to Hike with Your Dog in the Philadelphia Region, page 98:
      The hike along the trolley line from Smedley to Thompson Park is a wild and wooly excursion that brings you across train tracks, through dry creek beds, past ferns and wild roses and more.
    • 2015, Bubba Suess, Hiking California's Wine Country: A Guide to the Area's Greatest Hikes, page 166:
      The hike through the city of Napa's Alston Park is a great introduction to the Napa Valley.
    • 2019, Joe Baur, Best Hikes Cleveland: The Greatest Views, Wildlife, and Forest Strolls:
      You'll run into Powers Road and will hike on the sidewalks of Bedford across some train tracks and onto Broadway Avenue.
  2. An abrupt increase.
    Antonym: cut (used in same context); decrease
    The tenants were not happy with the rent hike.
    • 2021 October 20, “Network News: How do operators buy electricity?”, in RAIL, number 942, page 7:
      Those who are part of the consortium are protected from the current energy price hikes because they were tied into a fixed rate deal set almost a year ago (and continuing into most of next year).
    • 2022 June 15, Dominic Rushe, “Federal Reserve announces biggest interest rate hike since 1994”, in The Guardian[1]:
      With soaring inflation and the shadow of recession hanging over the United States, the Federal Reserve announced a 0.75 percentage-point increase in interest rates on Wednesday – the largest hike since 1994.
  3. (American football) The snap of the ball to start a play.
  4. A sharp upward tug to raise something.
    • 2016, Erik Schubach, The Hollow
      She gave a cute hike of her skirt as she spun and almost sauntered down the stairs.

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

hike (third-person singular simple present hikes, present participle hiking, simple past and past participle hiked)

  1. To take a long walk for pleasure or exercise.
    Don't forget to bring the map when we go hiking tomorrow.
  2. To unfairly or suddenly raise a price.
  3. (American football) To snap the ball to start a play.
  4. (nautical) To lean out to the windward side of a sailboat in order to counterbalance the effects of the wind on the sails.
  5. To pull up or tug upwards sharply.
    She hiked her skirt up.
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Interjection[edit]

hike

  1. Let's go; get moving. A command to a dog sled team, given by a musher.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  • hike in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911
  • hike at OneLook Dictionary Search

Ido[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin hīc.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

hike

  1. here, in this place

Derived terms[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Verb[edit]

hike (present tense hiker, past tense hika or hiket, past participle hika or hiket)

  1. form removed with the spelling reform of 2005; superseded by hige

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

After Danish hige.

Verb[edit]

hike (present tense hikar, past tense hika, past participle hika, passive infinitive hikast, present participle hikande, imperative hike/hik)

  1. to yearn

See also[edit]

References[edit]