insolent

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

PIE word
*swé

From Middle English, from Old French, from Latin īnsolēns (unaccustomed, unwanted, unusual, immoderate, excessive, arrogant, insolent), from in- (privative prefix) + solēns, present participle of solere (to be accustomed, to be wont).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈɪn.sə.lənt/
  • (file)
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈɪn.sə.lənt/

Adjective[edit]

insolent (comparative more insolent, superlative most insolent)

  1. Insulting in manner or words, particularly in an arrogant or insubordinate manner.
    Synonyms: arrogant, bold, cocky, impudent
  2. Rude.
    • 1907 August, Robert W[illiam] Chambers, chapter VI, in The Younger Set, New York, N.Y.: D. Appleton & Company, OCLC 24962326:
      “I don't mean all of your friends—only a small proportion—which, however, connects your circle with that deadly, idle, brainless bunch—the insolent chatterers at the opera, the gorged dowagers, [] the chlorotic squatters on huge yachts, the speed-mad fugitives from the furies of ennui, the neurotic victims of mental cirrhosus, []!”
    Synonyms: disrespectful, impertinent, insubordinate, offensive

Synonyms[edit]

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Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

insolent (plural insolents)

  1. A person who is insolent.
    • 1748, [Samuel Richardson], “Letter LXXVIII”, in Clarissa. Or, The History of a Young Lady: [], volume (please specify |volume=I to VII), London: [] S[amuel] Richardson; [], OCLC 13631815:
      What a way do you put yourself in miss! said the insolent.
    • 2010, Louisa Shea, The Cynic Enlightenment: Diogenes in the Salon (page 7)
      Diogenes Laertius reports that Diogenes was apt to take the identification with the dog at face value, as when he lifted his leg and relieved himself on a group of young insolents who teased him with a dog's bone []

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin īnsolēns, attested from 1653.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

insolent (masculine and feminine plural insolents)

  1. insolent

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Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ insolent”, in Gran Diccionari de la Llengua Catalana, Grup Enciclopèdia Catalana, 2022

Further reading[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Semi-learned borrowing from Latin īnsolēns.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

insolent (feminine insolente, masculine plural insolents, feminine plural insolentes)

  1. insolent

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Descendants[edit]

  • Romanian: insolent

Further reading[edit]


Occitan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin insolens.

Adjective[edit]

insolent m (feminine singular insolenta, masculine plural insolents, feminine plural insolentas)

  1. insolent

Derived terms[edit]

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Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French insolent, from Latin insolens.

Adjective[edit]

insolent m or n (feminine singular insolentă, masculine plural insolenți, feminine and neuter plural insolente)

  1. insolent

Declension[edit]