lector

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English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English lector, lectoure, lectour, from Late Latin lēctor, from legō (I read). “Voice-over” sense probably adapted from Polish lektor or Russian лектор (lektor).

Noun[edit]

lector (plural lectors)

  1. (religion) A lay person who reads aloud certain religious texts in a church service.
  2. (education) A public lecturer or reader at some universities.
  3. (historical, US, cigar industry) A person who reads aloud to workers to entertain them, appointed by a trade union.
    • 2004 October 27, D. J. R. Bruckner, “New Inflections and Nuance in a Florida Cigar Factory”, in The New York Times[1], ISSN 0362-4331:
      Its lyrical, poetic flights seem much more at home in the romantic musings of two sisters competing for the attention of the new, handsome lector, a man hired to read stories to workers in a Florida cigar factory, who might otherwise be mesmerized by the repetitive boredom of their jobs.
  4. (television, film) A person doing voice-over translation of foreign films, especially in Eastern European countries.
    • 2011, David Bellos, chapter 12, in Is that a Fish in Your Ear?:
      The Hungarian viewer of The Colbert Report wants to experience authentic American comedy, and the lector—like an interpreter performing chuchotage at a high-level meeting of heads of state—serves primarily as a check on the viewer's grasp of the real thing.

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

lector (third-person singular simple present lectors, present participle lectoring, simple past and past participle lectored)

  1. To do a voice-over translation of a film.
    • 2011, David Bellos, chapter 12, in Is that a Fish in Your Ear?:
      How much of Colbert's political satire can be truly grasped by a Hungarian viewer of a lectored episode is slightly beside the point: something gets through.

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin lēctor, lēctōrem.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

lector (feminine lectora, masculine plural lectors, feminine plural lectores)

  1. reading

Noun[edit]

lector m (plural lectora)

  1. reader

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From legō +‎ -tor.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lēctor m (genitive lēctōris, feminine lēctrīx); third declension

  1. a reader

Declension[edit]

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative lēctor lēctōrēs
Genitive lēctōris lēctōrum
Dative lēctōrī lēctōribus
Accusative lēctōrem lēctōrēs
Ablative lēctōre lēctōribus
Vocative lēctor lēctōrēs

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • lector in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • lector in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • lector in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • lector in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French lecteur

Noun[edit]

lector m (plural lectori)

  1. lecturer

Declension[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin lēctor, lēctōrem.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /leɡˈtoɾ/, [leɣ̞ˈt̪oɾ]
  • (file)

Adjective[edit]

lector (feminine lectora, masculine plural lectores, feminine plural lectoras)

  1. reading
  2. reading aloud to other people

Noun[edit]

lector m (plural lectores, feminine lectora, feminine plural lectoras)

  1. reader (a person who reads)
  2. reader (a person who reads a publication)

Noun[edit]

lector m (plural lectores)

  1. reader (any device that reads something)

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]