maligne

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English[edit]

Adjective[edit]

maligne (comparative more maligne, superlative most maligne)

  1. Obsolete spelling of malign.
    • 1543 January, The Chronicle of Jhon Hardyng in Metre, frõ the First Begynnyng of Englãde, vnto yͤ Reigne of Edwarde yͤ Fourth Where He Made an End of His Chronicle. [], London: [] Richardi Graftoni, folio L.xvi., verso:
      He was a kyng, full worthy and condigne / That let not, for his eaſe nor his laboure / To ſearche and ſee defautes, that were maligne / And theim correcte, he was a gouernoure / God ſet neuer kyng, to be a ryotoure / To trippe on tapettes, and lyue in ydelneſſe / But for to rule, with all kyndes of buſyneſſe
    • 1549 August 23, Henry Bullynger [i.e., Heinrich Bullinger], translated by [unknown], A Treatise or Sermon of Henry Bullynger, Much Fruitfull and Necessarye for This Tyme, Concernynge Magistrates and Obedience of Subiectes. [], London: [] [W. Powell?] for Gwalter Lynne []:
      As who ſhuld ſay for ſuch maner of perſõs as do maligne ⁊ diſquiet honeſt ⁊ quiet mẽ which wold faine liue in reſt ⁊ cannot.
    • 1613, William Browne, “The First Song”, in Britannia’s Pastorals. The First Booke, London: [] Iohn Haviland, published 1625, →OCLC, page 20:
      Quoth th'other, haue thy ſtarres maligne been ſuch, / That their predominations ſvvay ſo much / Ouer the reſt, that vvith a milde aſpect / The Liues and loues of Shepherds doe affect?

Verb[edit]

maligne (third-person singular simple present malignes, present participle maligning, simple past and past participle maligned)

  1. Obsolete spelling of malign.
    • 1548, [] [T]he Egloges of Alexander Barclay, Priest, Whereof the First Thre Conteineth the Miseries of Courters and Courtes, of All Princes in Generall. [], London: [] Humfrey Powell:
      For if that I ſpake it, in ſome audience, / Some men wolde maligne, and take it for offence.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, “Book III, Canto IIII”, in The Faerie Queene. [], London: [] [John Wolfe] for William Ponsonbie, →OCLC, page 455:
      But if the heauens did his dayes enuie, / And my ſhort blis maligne, yet mote they well / Thus much afford me, ere that he did die / That the dim eies of my deare Marinell / I mote haue cloſed, and him bed farewell, / Sith other offices for mother meet / They would not graunt.
    • 1607, William [Barlow], A Brand, Titio Erepta. [], London: [] Iohn Windet for Mathew Law:
      Now Indignation is a fire, ſaith the Prophet, it will vexe the partie whom it malignes, as fire vexeth the rawe fleſh in the roſting or boyling. Si aut fiſcellam iunco texerem, aut palmarũ folia complicarem, aut ſudore vultus panem comederem; were I a Basket-maker, or a garland winder, or of any baſe trade that ſhould make mee ſweat for the bread I eate, ſaith S. Hierom, Nemo me morderet, nemo inuideret, No man would maligne me, no man would traduce me; but now, that I giue my ſelfe to the ſtudie and interpretation of the Scriptures, I am a Diuine, a Writer, a Preacher, Me obeleſcis notant, I am ſcortcht coleblack with their obliſques, & obloquies.

Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin malignus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

maligne (feminine maligna, masculine and feminine plural malignes)

  1. malignant
    Antonym: benigne

Further reading[edit]

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)

Adjective[edit]

maligne (not comparable)

  1. (medicine) malignant
    Synonym: kwaadaardig
    Antonym: benigne

Inflection[edit]

Inflection of maligne
uninflected maligne
inflected maligne
comparative
positive
predicative/adverbial maligne
indefinite m./f. sing. maligne
n. sing. maligne
plural maligne
definite maligne
partitive malignes

French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

maligne

  1. feminine singular of malin

Interlingua[edit]

Adjective[edit]

maligne (comparative plus maligne, superlative le plus maligne)

  1. malign

Italian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /maˈliɲ.ɲe/
  • Rhymes: -iɲɲe
  • Hyphenation: ma‧lì‧gne

Adjective[edit]

maligne

  1. feminine plural of maligno

Anagrams[edit]

Latin[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

maligne

  1. vocative masculine singular of malignus

References[edit]

  • maligne”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • maligne”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • maligne in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette

Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from Old French maligne, from Latin malignus.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /maˈliːn(ə)/, /maˈli(n)ɡn(ə)/

Adjective[edit]

maligne

  1. evil, malicious, malign
  2. (pathology, astrology) harmful
Related terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • English: malign
  • Scots: maling (obsolete)
References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

maligne

  1. Alternative form of malignen

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Adjective[edit]

maligne

  1. definite singular/plural of malign

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Adjective[edit]

maligne

  1. definite singular/plural of malign