mica

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See also: mică and míca

English[edit]

A sheet of mica

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin mīca (grain, crumb).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mica (countable and uncountable, plural micas)

  1. (mineralogy) Any of a group of hydrous aluminosilicate minerals characterized by highly perfect cleavage, so that they readily separate into very thin leaves, more or less elastic.

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Occitan [Term?] (compare Occitan mica), from Vulgar Latin *micca, variant of Latin mīca.

Noun[edit]

mica f (plural miques)

  1. a bit, a small piece
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from Latin mīca.

Noun[edit]

mica f (plural miques)

  1. (mineralogy) mica

Further reading[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin mīca.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)

Noun[edit]

mica f (plural micas)

  1. (mineralogy) mica

Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin mīca.

Noun[edit]

mica f (uncountable)

  1. (mineralogy) mica

Italian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin mīca, from Proto-Italic *smīkā, from Proto-Indo-European *smeyg- (small, thin, delicate).

Noun[edit]

mica f (plural miche)

  1. (archaic or literary) breadcrumb
  2. (by extension) bit, morsel
    Synonym: minuzzolo
Related terms[edit]

Adverb[edit]

mica

  1. (colloquial) not
    Mica male!Not bad!
  2. (colloquial) hardly, you know
    Mica sono stupido
    I’m hardly stupid; I’m not stupid, you know
  3. (colloquial) bit
    Non è mica cambiatoIt hasn't changed one bit
  4. (colloquial) at all
    Non costa mica moltoIt is not at all expensive
  5. (colloquial) by any chance
    Non hai mica trovato il mio portafoglio?
    Have you seen my wallet by any chance?

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from Latin mīca, the same source as the above.

Noun[edit]

mica f (plural miche)

  1. (mineralogy) mica (mineral)

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Uncertain:

Attested from Cato onwards.

A number of Romance forms, eg. Romanian mic, Calabrian miccu, reflect an unattested adjective *mīccus - this is probably unrelated, being a borrowing from Ancient Greek μῑκκός (mīkkós), variant of μῑκρός (mīkrós, small); the form *mīcca is associated with the meaning “loaf of bread” particularly in Gallo-Romance and Gallo-Italic.[1]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mīca f (genitive mīcae); first declension

  1. a grain (esp. a glittering one: of salt, marble, etc.), crumb
  2. (Medieval Latin, Gallia) a miche (a round loaf of brown bread)
  3. (New Latin, mineralogy) mica

Declension[edit]

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative mīca mīcae
Genitive mīcae mīcārum
Dative mīcae mīcīs
Accusative mīcam mīcās
Ablative mīcā mīcīs
Vocative mīca mīcae

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Eastern Romance:
    • Romanian: mică
  • Italian: mica
  • Old French: mie
  • Old Portuguese: miga
  • Old Spanish: miga
  • English: mica
  • French: mica
  • Galician: mica
  • Portuguese: mica
  • Spanish: mica
  • Vulgar Latin: *mīcca

References[edit]

  1. ^ von Wartburg, Walther (1928–2002) , “mīca”, in Französisches Etymologisches Wörterbuch (in German), volume 62, page 76

Further reading[edit]

  • mica in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • mica in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • mica in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • mica in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin mīca. Compare the inherited doublet miga.

Noun[edit]

mica f (plural micas)

  1. (mineralogy) mica (hydrous aluminosilicate mineral)

Related terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

mica

  1. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present indicative of micar
  2. second-person singular (tu, sometimes used with você) affirmative imperative of micar

Romanian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

mica

  1. definite nominative feminine singular of mic
  2. definite accusative feminine singular of mic

Spanish[edit]

Spanish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia es

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin mīca. Compare the inherited doublet miga.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mica f (plural micas)

  1. (mineralogy) mica

Related terms[edit]