omit

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See also: omît

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

At least by 1422, from late Middle English omitten, borrowed from Latin omittere, present active infinitive of omittō (to let go), from ob- + mittō (to send), but also had the connotations “to fail to perform” and “to neglect”.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /oʊˈmɪt/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɪt

Verb[edit]

omit (third-person singular simple present omits, present participle omitting, simple past and past participle omitted)

  1. (transitive) To leave out or exclude.
  2. (transitive) To fail to perform.
    • 1988, Douglas Adams, The Long Dark Tea-Time of the Soul, William Heinemann Ltd, page 136:
      She climbed out of the car and carefully omitted to lock it. She never left anything of value in it, and she found that it was to her advantage if people didn’t have to break anything in order to find that out.
  3. (transitive, rare) To neglect or take no notice of.

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

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Anagrams[edit]


Finnish[edit]

Verb[edit]

omit

  1. Second-person singular indicative present form of omia.
  2. Second-person singular indicative past form of omia.

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Verb[edit]

omit

  1. third-person singular past historic of omettre