ond

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See also: ónd and önd

Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse vándr.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

ond (neuter ondt, definite and plural onde, comparative ondere or værre, superlative ondest or værst)

  1. evil

Antonyms[edit]


Faroese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse ǫnd.

Noun[edit]

ond f (genitive singular andar, plural andir)

  1. breath
  2. soul

Declension[edit]

f4 Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative ond ondin andir andirnar
Accusative ond ondina andir andirnar
Dative ond ondini ondum ondunum
Genitive andar andarinnar anda andanna



Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Same as vond

Adjective[edit]

ond (neuter singular ondt, definite singular and plural onde, comparative ondere or verre, indefinite superlative ondest or verst, definite superlative ondeste or verste)

  1. bad, evil, wicked, vicious
    onde ånder - evil spirits

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Variant of and.

Pronunciation[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

ond

  1. and

Synonyms[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse vándr.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

ond

  1. evil
  2. angry (dated)
    nej, jag är inte ond på dig
    no, I’m not angry with you.
  3. hurting, making pain
    jag har en ond
    I have a hurt toe

Declension[edit]

Usage notes[edit]

  • The more common use is min tå gör ont (my toe hurts) or jag har ont i tån (I have pain in the toe)

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]


Welsh[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

Conjunction[edit]

ond

  1. but