vicious

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English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Anglo-Norman vicious, Old French vicious (modern French vicieux), from Latin vitiōsus, from vitium ‎(fault, vice).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

vicious ‎(comparative viciouser or more vicious, superlative viciousest or most vicious)

  1. Violent, destructive and cruel.
  2. Savage and aggressive.
    • 1922, Michael Arlen, chapter 2/9/1, in “Piracy”: A Romantic Chronicle of These Days:
      He had always been remarkably immune from such little ailments, and had only once in his life been ill, of a vicious pneumonia long ago at school. He hadn't the faintest idea what to with a cold in the head, he just took quinine and continued to blow his nose.
  3. (archaic) Pertaining to vice; characterised by immorality or depravity.
    • 1603, John Florio, translating Michel de Montaigne, Essays, Folio Society, 2006, vol.1, p.195:
      We may so seize on vertue, that if we embrace it with an over-greedy and violent desire, it may become vicious.

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Old French[edit]

Adjective[edit]

vicious m

  1. vicious; malicious
  2. defective; not capable of functioning

Declension[edit]

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