postulate

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See also: Postulate

English[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

Medieval Latin postulāt- ‎(asked), from the verb postulāre ‎(to ask), from Latin postulō ‎(request).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun
  • (UK) enPR: pŏsʹtyo͝o-lət IPA(key): /ˈpɒstjʊlət/
  • (US) enPR: pŏsʹchə-lət, pŏsʹchə-lāt', IPA(key): /ˈpɑstʃələt/, /ˈpɑstʃəˌleɪt/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: pos‧tu‧late
Adjective
  • (UK) enPR: pŏsʹtyo͝o-lət IPA(key): /ˈpɒstjʊlət/
  • (US) enPR: pŏsʹchə-lət, IPA(key): /ˈpɑstʃələt/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: pos‧tu‧late
Verb
  • (UK) enPR: pŏsʹtyo͝o-lāt IPA(key): /ˈpɒstjʊleɪt/
  • (US) enPR: pŏsʹchə-lāt' IPA(key): /ˈpɑstʃəˌleɪt/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: pos‧tu‧late

Noun[edit]

postulate ‎(plural postulates)

  1. Something assumed without proof as being self-evident or generally accepted, especially when used as a basis for an argument.
  2. A fundamental element; a basic principle.
  3. (logic) An axiom.
  4. A requirement; a prerequisite.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Adjective[edit]

postulate ‎(not comparable)

  1. Postulated.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Hudibras to this entry?)

Verb[edit]

postulate ‎(third-person singular simple present postulates, present participle postulating, simple past and past participle postulated)

  1. To assume as a truthful or accurate premise or axiom, especially as a basis of an argument.
    • 1883, Benedictus de Spinoza, translated by R. H. M. Elwes, Ethics, Part 3, Prop. XXII,
      But this pleasure or pain is postulated to come to us accompanied by the idea of an external cause; []
    • 1911, Encyclopædia Britannica, "Infinite",
      [T]he attempt to arrive at a physical explanation of existence led the Ionian thinkers to postulate various primal elements or simply the infinite τὸ ἀπειρον.
  2. (transitive, intransitive, Christianity, historical) To appoint or request one's appointment to an ecclesiastical office.
    • 1874, John Small (ed.), The Poetical Works of Gavin Douglas, Bishop of Dunkeld, Vol 1, p. xvi
      [A]lthough Douglas was postulated to it [the Abbacy of Arbroath], and signed letters and papers under this designation his nomination [] was never completed.
  3. (transitive, intransitive, obsolete) To request, demand or claim for oneself.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]


Italian[edit]

Verb[edit]

postulate

  1. second-person plural present indicative of postulare
  2. second-person plural imperative of postulare
  3. feminine plural of postulato

Latin[edit]

Verb[edit]

postulāte

  1. first-person plural present active imperative of postulō